Daily English
Cultural English
Practical English

099 When do we celebrate Independence Day?

访问量:
C: Holidays

99. When do we celebrate Independence Day?
Answer:
July 4

Explanation:
Every year on July 4, millions of Americans commemorate (or remember and honor) the day when the United States adopted (or approved) the Declaration of
Independence and created a new country that was independent and no longer part of Great Britain.

Independence Day is a national holiday, meaning that most people don’t have to work that day. Instead, they usually spend the day with family and friends. Since Independence Day falls in the summer (or happens in the summer) when the weather is very nice, the tradition (or something that is normally done the same way every year) is to have a barbeque outside, where people cook meat over a fire in a special machine called a grill. Probably the most traditional foods are hamburgers and hot dogs. People also eat a lot of chips and salads, and drink sodas and beer. There is usually watermelon, which is a large, round, green fruit that is red with black seeds inside, for dessert.

Baseball games, parades (or events where many people celebrate by walking through the street slowly), and concerts are also popular on Independence Day.
Many politicians (or people who have been chosen to work in government) give speeches that day, talking about the importance of U.S. history and patriotism (or feelings of being proud of one’s country).

At dusk, which is the time of day when the sun sets and it begins to get dark, people often go to parks to see fireworks. Fireworks are colorful explosions in the air that make a lot of noise and are pretty to look at. Most towns and cities have fireworks displays where they set off (or start) many fireworks in a short period of time. Some people go to sit on the roof of their home, where they can see many fireworks displays at the same time.

Other people like to set off their own fireworks. In June and early July, many fireworks are sold to individuals and families. These fireworks are smaller and can be lit (or started with fire) in the street to make noise and colored lights. Some cities and states allow people to set off their own fireworks, but it is not legal in other cities and states.

Glossary

to commemorate – to do something to remember and honor an important person or event in history
* Lillian commemorates the death of her husband every year by visiting his grave.

to fall in (a period of time) – to happen in a certain period of time
* Her birthday falls in the month of March.

tradition – the way things have always been done; something that is done the same way every time
* They have a tradition of always going to Raleigh, North Carolina for one weekend in August.

barbeque – a meal where people cook meat over a fire on a piece of metal
* Our neighbors had a great barbeque with hamburgers and hot dogs.

patriotism – feelings of being proud of one's country
* Jerry shows his patriotism by flying the U.S. flag in his front yard.

dusk – the time of day when the sun sets and it begins to get dark
* Yes, you can go play in the park, but please come back home before dusk.

fireworks – colorful explosions in the air that make a lot of noise and are pretty to look at
* There are usually a lot of fireworks when the Olympics begin.

to set off – to cause an explosion
* We shouldn’t set off fireworks next to dry leaves because we might accidentally start a fire.

to light (something) – to start a candle, match, fireworks, or something else with fire
* Please don't light your cigarette inside the house.