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046 What is the political party of the President now?

访问量:
46. What is the political party of the President now?
Answer:
Republican (Party) (由于编写此文时间很长,所以答案和现在有差异,大家重点放在对文章内容的理解上)

Explanation:
Senators, representatives, and the president of the United States almost all have political affiliations (or membership in a political party), but not necessarily the same ones. Sometimes most of the members of Congress have the same political affiliation that the president does. When that happens, making laws is usually easy, because Congress and the president have the same beliefs about what the government should do. Congress makes laws and the president approves them.

At other times, things don’t work as smoothly (or easily). Congress has one political affiliation, but the president has another political affiliation. When that happens, it is more difficult to make laws, because Congress and the president do not agree on what the government should do. Congress might pass a law, but when it goes to the president for approval, he or she may not sign it (or put his or her name on it to show that it is okay to make it a law).

Whether or not Congress and the President have the same political affiliation can change during an administration (or the period of time when one person is serving or working as president). That’s because the president is elected every four years, but Congress is elected more often. Members of the House of Representatives are elected every two years. Members of the Senate are elected for six years, but one-third (or 33%) of them are elected every two years, so the political affiliation of the majority (or the bigger part, more than 50% of the members) can change every two years.

This means that a president might begin his or her administration or term with a Congress that has a majority (or over 50%) of its members from the same party, but at the end of the administration, the situation might have reversed itself (or become the opposite). Presidents try to take advantage of (or use the opportunity to get the most or best results) the time when the majority of Congress members have the same political affiliation, because this is when the president can most easily pursue (or try to get) his or her agenda (or the plan of what a person wants to get done while working in a public job).

Glossary

political affiliation – membership in a political party
* Have you ever dated someone with a different political affiliation than your own?

to sign (something) – to write one's name on something, usually to show approval or agreement
* If you agree with everything in the contract, please sign your name here.

administration – the period of time when one person is serving or working as president
* What was the most important accomplishment of President Monroe’s administration?

majority – the bigger part of something; more than 50% of something
* The majority of American adults in this part of the country own a car.

to reverse – to become the opposite of what something was
* The government has reversed its policy on pollution and now is helping companies be more environmentally-friendly.

to take advantage of (something) – to use an opportunity to get the most or best of something
* Dinah took advantage of a national scholarship program to pay for graduate school.

to pursue (something) – to work hard to get something, especially if it is difficult or requires a lot of time
* Why did you decide to pursue a degree in civil engineering?

agenda – a plan for what will be discussed at a meeting; a person's plan for what he or she wants to get done while working in a public job
* He has a detailed agenda for what he wants to do as the city's mayor.