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038 What is the highest court in the United States?

访问量:
38. What is the highest court in the United States?
Answer:
The Supreme Court

Explanation:
Everybody makes mistakes, but what happens if it is a judge (or a person who makes legal decisions in a court)? Imagine that you are in a lawsuit (or a problem or argument that has to be talked about in court) and the judge rules (or decides) against you, but you still think that you are right. Your next step is an appeal, which is an official document asking a higher, more important court to rule on your lawsuit. And if that appeal fails (or doesn’t work), you might make another appeal to an even higher court. Eventually, however, there are no higher courts because you have arrived at the Supreme Court, which is often called “the highest (or most important) court in the United States.”

The Supreme Court doesn’t agree to rule on all cases (or lawsuits). The Supreme Court receives more than 7,000 petitions (or requests to rule on a case) each year, but it accepts fewer than 100 of them. That is because the Supreme Court has limited time and people to do the work, and it wants to use them to rule on only the most important cases. In particular, it wants to rule on cases that are related to how federal laws are interpreted (or understood), especially when they are related to the U.S. Constitution (or the country’s most important legal document).

The Supreme Court’s cases are very far-reaching, meaning that they have a lot of influence in American culture and law. Some of their cases are well known to most Americans. For example, one famous case known as Brown v. Board of Education made it illegal to have separate schools for white students and black students. Another famous case known as Roe v. Wade made abortions (the practice of ending a pregnancy so the baby is never born) legal.

The Supreme Court meets in the Supreme Court Building in the center of Washington, DC. The building is sometimes called the “Temple of Justice” where a
temple is a holy place that people build for their gods.

Glossary

judge – a person whose job is to manage a trial and courtroom and decide whether a person should be punished for breaking the law
* She has worked as a lawyer for years, but she dreams of becoming a judge.

lawsuit – a case; a problem or argument that has to be talked about and a decision made in court
* Rick started a lawsuit against his employer when he lost his job for no reason.

appeal – an official request or document asking a higher, more important court to rule on one's lawsuit
* The judge said that Jess should pay $100,000 for what he did, but he's filing an appeal, because he doesn't think he should have to pay anything.

Supreme Court – the highest, most powerful court in the United States
* Did you hear about the Supreme Court's decision that will change the gun laws in the United States?

case – a lawsuit; a problem or argument that has to be talked about in court
* As a criminal lawyer, Janet's has handled many cases involving thieves.

petition – a request to rule on a case; a request to hear a lawsuit and make a legal decision on it
* The judge laughed when he received a petition from a child who thought it should be illegal for his parents to ask him to clean his room.

far-reaching – having a lot of influence or impact; having many consequences; being very important
* His medical research has had far-reaching effects on how doctors treat people with searious diseases.

abortion – the practice of ending a pregnancy so the baby is never born
* Some people believe that abortions should be legal and others do not.

temple – a holy place that people build for their gods
* They go to the temple to worship every Sunday.