Daily English
Cultural English
Practical English

1190 Dealing With Foot Problems

访问量:
Complete Transcript
Welcome to English as a Second Language Podcast number 1,190 – Dealing with Foot Problems.

This is English as a Second Language podcast episode 1,190. I’m your host, Dr. Jeff McQuillan, coming to you from the Center for Educational Development in beautiful Los Angeles, California.

Visit our website at ESLPod.com. Become a member of ESL Podcast – why not? If you do, you can download the Learning Guide for this episode that contains a complete transcript of everything we say, along with a vocabulary list, definitions, sample sentences, and culture notes related to this episode.

The dialogue today is between Walt and Francesca about problems with your feet. Let’s get started.

[start of dialogue]

Walt: What are you doing?

Francesca: I’m selecting and organizing my photos for a presentation.

Walt: Oh, can I see? All of these photos are of feet!

Francesca: Well, I am a podiatrist and I’m giving a talk about foot conditions.

Walt: Ew, some of these are really disgusting!

Francesca: You’re looking at some of the most common foot conditions: blisters, corns, bunions, calluses, and athlete’s foot.

Walt: What is that?

Francesca: That’s an ingrown toenail and those are infected toenails.

Walt: I’m really glad I don’t have either one of those problems.

Francesca: You should be even happier you don’t have one of the more serious conditions such as fallen arches, a clubfoot, or arthritis in your feet.

Walt: But I do have one problem. Let me take these shoes off and show you.

Francesca: Pee-ew! I don’t even need to look at them to know you have very bad foot odor.

Walt: What should I do?

Francesca: Get some new shoes, keep them dry, and change your socks every day.

Walt: Every day? You mean I have to own more than one pair?

[end of dialogue]

Walt asks Francesca, at the beginning of our dialogue, “What are you doing?” Francesca says, “I’m selecting and organizing my photos for a presentation.” A “presentation” is when you give a little talk or speech to a group of people, giving them information about something. Often during a presentation, you will have something to show the audience – the people listening to you.

In this case, Francesca is going to be showing them some photos – some photographs, some pictures. Walt says, “Oh, can I see? All of these photos are of feet!” Your “feet,” of course, are what you walk on. Francesca says, “Well, I am a podiatrist and I’m giving a talk about foot conditions.” A “podiatrist” (podiatrist) is a foot doctor, a medical doctor who specializes in feet.

Walt says, “Ew, some of these are really disgusting.” Walt is looking at the photos and he thinks some of the photos are “disgusting” (disgusting). Something that is “disgusting” makes you feel sick. Something that is very unpleasant to look at might be described as “disgusting.” Walt begins actually by saying, “Ew,” which we would usually spell (ew). It’s a noise you make to show that you are disgusted with something – that you find something very gross or unpleasant.

Francesca says, “You’re looking at some of the most common foot conditions: blisters, corns, bunions, calluses, and athlete’s foot.” Francesca explains that these photos Walt is looking at are of some very common problems people have with their feet. The first problem is “blisters” (blisters).

A “blister” is a red-colored area of skin that is sort of like a bubble. It is what we would call a “raised” area of skin. The bubble often has a clear liquid in it that is caused usually by either heat – that is, if you burn your skin you might get a blister – or by rubbing your skin against something. That may also cause a blister. Blisters are very common. Everyone gets blisters. If you wear a pair of shoes that are too tight, you might get blisters on your feet because your skin is rubbing against the shoe.

“Corns” (corns) are small thick spots of dead skin, especially on your feet. Once again, these are caused usually by pressure or rubbing your feet against something. Many people have corns, little bits of dead skin, on their feet. “Bunions” (bunions) are painful bumps that are found on your toe – your “big toe,” we would call it. Your hand has 10 fingers. Your feet have 10 “toes” (toes). The biggest toe is the first one, and that is where you would find a bunion. Bunions can be very painful.

“Calluses” (calluses) are large areas of hard, dead skin that once again are often found on the bottom of your feet, although you could have calluses on your hands as well. If you work a lot with your hands, use your hands a lot, you might eventually develop areas of hard, dead skin on your hands. We would call those “calluses.” You could have calluses on your hands. You could have calluses on your feet.

Finally, there is a condition called “athlete’s foot.” An “athlete” is someone who participates in sports or who does a lot of physical activity such as running or swimming or playing football. All of those activities involve athletes – people who are physically fit. “Athlete’s foot,” however, is actually a kind of infection that grows on your feet. It’s what we would call a “fungal (fungal) infection,” often found between your toes or underneath your toenails.

Francesca, then, has photographs of all these different conditions. Walt then asks, “What is that?” He doesn’t understand one of the photos, or what is in one of the photos. Francesca explains, “That’s an ingrown toenail and those are infected toenails.” A “toenail” (toenail) is the hard part at the end of your toes. You have fingernails at the end of your fingers.

Usually you have to cut or trim your fingernails because they grow and get too long. The same is true with your toenails. An “ingrown (ingrown) toenail” is a toenail that starts to grow into your foot and can be very painful. If something is “infected” (infected), it has some sort of bacteria that causes it to be painful and perhaps turn red. “Infected” comes from the verb “to infect” (infect) and is related to the noun “infection.” You can have an “infection” in many different parts of your body, not just in your feet.

Walt says, “I’m really glad I don’t have either of those problems.” Francesca says, “You should be even happier you don’t have one of the more serious conditions such as fallen arches, a clubfoot, or arthritis in your feet.” Francesca describes three other problems you could have with your feet. The first one is “fallen (fallen) arches (arches).”

The “arch” of your foot is that part between the front and back of the foot on the side that goes up. It’s the part of your foot the doesn’t touch the ground when you put your feet on the ground. If you have “fallen arches,” your arches do touch the ground and that can cause additional problems.

A “clubfoot” (clubfoot) is a condition that some people are born with, in which one of the feet is twisted. It’s turned inward and prevents the bottom of the foot from being placed flat on the ground. “Clubfoot” is a condition that nowadays is often corrected with surgery or other kinds of early treatment with children.

“Arthritis” (arthritis) is something that can affect your bones and different parts of your body. It is when the joints of your bone – where the bones connect together, where they come together – become swollen and often painful. You can have arthritis in your feet. You could have arthritis in your legs. You could have arthritis in your hands.

So, Francesca is describing these other, more serious conditions that can affect one’s feet. Walt says, “But I do have one problem. Let me take these shoes off and show you.” So, Walt is taking his shoes off and Francesca reacts to the smell that she notices. She say, “Pee-ew!” “Pee-ew” is a phrase that we use that means something smells very bad or unpleasant. She says, “I don’t even need to look at them” – meaning your feet – “to know you have very bad foot odor.” “Odor” (odor) is smell, an unpleasant smell.

Walt says, “What should I do?” Francesca says, “Get some new shoes, keep them dry,” meaning your shoes dry, “and change your socks every day.” Doesn’t everyone change their socks every day? Walt says, “Every day? You mean I have to own” – I have to have – “more than one pair?” (more than one pair of socks). That is kind of weird, isn’t it, that Walt only has one pair of socks? I don’t think I’d want to be next to him when he took off his shoes, either.

Now let’s listen to the dialogue, this time at a normal speed.

[start of dialogue]

Walt: What are you doing?

Francesca: I’m selecting and organizing my photos for a presentation.

Walt: Oh, can I see? All of these photos are of feet!

Francesca: Well, I am a podiatrist and I’m giving a talk about foot conditions.

Walt: Ew, some of these are really disgusting!

Francesca: You’re looking at some of the most common foot conditions: blisters, corns, bunions, calluses, and athlete’s foot.

Walt: What is that?

Francesca: That’s an ingrown toenail and those are infected toenails.

Walt: I’m really glad I don’t have either one of those problems.

Francesca: You should be even happier you don’t have one of the more serious conditions such as fallen arches, a clubfoot, or arthritis in your feet.

Walt: But I do have one problem. Let me take these shoes off and show you.

Francesca: Pee-ew! I don’t even need to look at them to know you have very bad foot odor.

Walt: What should I do?

Francesca: Get some new shoes, keep them dry, and change your socks every day.

Walt: Every day? You mean I have to own more than one pair?

[end of dialogue]

If you have to make a presentation in English, you’ll be glad that you’ve been listening to our wonderful scripts by our wonderful scriptwriter, Dr. Lucy Tse. They’ll teach you a lot of good English.

From Los Angeles, California, I’m Jeff McQuillan. Thank you for listening. Come back and listen to us again right here on ESL Podcast.

English as a Second Language Podcast was written and produced by Dr. Lucy Tse, hosted by Dr. Jeff McQuillan. Copyright 2016 by the Center for Educational Development.

Glossary
presentation – an event when one shares information with an audience, usually speaking while standing in front of a group, often with the support of slides or other visual aids

* Each student has to make a 10-minute presentation about an ancient culture.

podiatrist – a doctor who specializes in the study of feet and medical conditions that affect the feet

* My podiatrist recommends wearing open-toed shoes until the condition improves.

ew – a noise made to indicate disgust because something is very unpleasant or disgusting

* Ew! Do you really expect me to ride around in your car when it smells of dirty gym socks?

disgusting – very gross and unpleasant, making one feel sick

* Worms and parasites are disgusting. How can you stand studying them all day?

blister – a raised, red-colored area of skin filled with clear liquid, usually cause by the skin rubbing against something for a long period of time

* These new hiking boots seemed to fit well in the store, but look at all the blisters they caused on my hike this morning!

corn – a small, thick, and usually rounded spot of dead skin, especially on the feet, that develops under exposure to significant pressure or friction (rubbing together)

* Grandma has a painful corn on the side of her big toe, probably caused by wearing high-heeled shoes for too many years.

bunion – a hard, bony bump that forms at the base on one’s big toe

* Having a large bunion can make it difficult to find shoes that fit properly.

callus – a large area of hard, dead skin, usually on the bottom of one’s foot and usually caused by repeated exposure to significant pressure or friction (rubbing together)

* Sheila walks around outdoors without shoes on all the time and has big calluses on the bottom of her feet.

athlete’s foot – a fungal infection that grows on the feet, especially between the toes and/or under the toenails

* People with athlete’s foot are not allowed to swim at the local swimming pool due to the risk of infection.

ingrown toenail – a painful red area on the corner of a toe, usually the big toe, caused when the side of the nail grows into the skin, causing irritation

* If you don’t cut and file your nails carefully, you might end up with a jagged edge that develops into an ingrown toenail.

infected – diseased due to the presence of bacteria, usually indicated by an area that is red, raised, and/or painful

* Wash the cut with soap and water, and then put a clean bandage on it so it doesn’t get infected.

fallen arches – a condition where the foot rest flatly on the floor, without a rounded, bridge-like part in the middle

* Blake has fallen arches that make it difficult for him to stand for long periods of time.

clubfoot – a condition people are born with in which the foot is twisted and turn inward sharply, preventing the bottom of the foot to be place flat on the ground

* Owen was born with a clubfoot, but he wore special leg braces that corrected the problem by the time he was four years old.

arthritis – a condition that makes movement of one or more body parts difficult because the joints are inflamed (red and swollen) and irritated

* Narjes used to enjoy knitting, but she hasn’t been able to continue doing it since she developed arthritis, which makes it difficult for her to hold knitting needles.

pee-ew – a phrased used to mean that something smells very bad or unpleasant

* Pee-ew, it smells awful in here! How long has it been since you cleaned out the refrigerator?

foot odor – a bad, unpleasant smell around one’s feet, often noticed when one removes socks and shoes

* The teenage boys’ foot odor makes the entire locker room smell terrible.

Comprehension Questions
1. Which of these conditions is not caused by shoes that fit poorly?
a) Blisters
b) Calluses
c) Athlete’s foot

2. Which of these conditions is most likely to affect an elderly person?
a) Fallen arches
b) Clubfoot
c) Arthritis

Answers at bottom.

What Else Does It Mean?
corn

The word “corn,” in this podcast, means a small, thick, and usually rounded spot of dead skin, especially on the feet, that develops under exposure to significant pressure or friction (rubbing together): “When the corns get especially painful, Mariah often soaks her feet in warm, salty water.” Normally, “corn” is a tall plants the produces cobs covered with small, round, yellow kernels that are eaten: “I usually serve pork chops with creamed corn.” Or, “This chili would taste even better with some corn in it.” The “Corn Belt” refers to a large area in the central United States, especially Iowa, where a lot of corn is grown. Finally, the word “corny” describes something that is too silly and repeated too often to be interesting or funny anymore: “He told a lot of corny jokes and the audience barely laughed. He isn’t a very good comedian.”

clubfoot

In this podcast, the phrase “clubfoot” means a condition in which the feet turn inward sharply, present at birth, making it difficult to walk: “The baby was absolutely perfect, except she was born with clubfeet, which made it difficult for her to learn to walk.” A “club” is also an organization or association of people with shared interests: “Have you considered joining the chess club?” A “club sandwich” is a sandwich that has three pieces of bread instead of the normal two pieces, with meat and vegetables between each two pieces: “This club sandwich is so tall, it’s almost impossible for me to bite into it.” Finally, “club soda” refers to soda water, sparkling water, or water with bubbles in it: “I’d like a club soda with a slice of lemon, please.”

Culture Note
Specialty Shoes

Some people have foot conditions that require using “specialty shoes” (shoes that fill a particular purpose or function). For example, people who have “disorders” (something that does not work properly) of the foot or ankle might need to wear “orthopedic” shoes that are specially designed to provide additional “support” (help for something to maintain the proper position) or “cushioning” (extra padding to keep something soft and comfortable). People with “lesser” (not as severe) conditions might simply have an “orthopedic insert,” or a shaped piece of plastic or other material that is put inside of a regular shoe to provide additional support or cushioning. Orthopedic shoes and inserts can be made from a “mold” (a hollow shape or container into which liquid can be poured to create something of that shape) that matches the shape of the patient’s foot.

People who have “diabetes” (diseases that result in having too much sugar in the blood) may have skin problems of the feet, so sometimes the must wear diabetic shoes. These shoes are designed to “prevent” (not allow to happen) skin “breakage” (cuts; openings). For example, they might open and close with “Velcro” (strips, one with small plastic hooks and one with small plastic loops, that are used to hold two things together) to make it easier to put on and doff take off shoes.

Finally, people with weak or fallen arches might need shoes with special “arch support.” These shoes have a raised, padded area where the foot’s arch should be, so that the foot can rest against the bottom of the shoe, but still “maintain” (keep; have) a “proper” (correct) arch. Almost all athletic shoes have arch support of some kind.

Comprehension Answers
1 - c

2 - c