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1099 Child Sports Injuries

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Complete Transcript
Welcome to English as a Second Language Podcast number 1,099 – Child Sports Injuries.

This is English as a Second Language Podcast episode 1,099. I’m your host, Dr. Jeff McQuillan, coming to you from the Center for Educational Development in beautiful Los Angeles, California.

Go to our website at ESLPod.com. Take a look at our ESL Podcast Courses in Business and Daily English. Check out our ESL Podcast Blog. You can also like us on Facebook at facebook.com/eslpod.

On this episode, we’re going to listen to Angela and Juan talk about children who get hurt playing sports. Let’s get started.

[start of dialogue]

Angela: Wait! I need to put sunscreen on Davy before he goes to the game.

Juan: It’s not sunny today. He doesn’t need sunscreen.

Angela: And here are four water bottles to make sure he stays hydrated and doesn’t get heatstroke.

Juan: One of the other parents is bringing drinks for the kids. It’s fine. We don’t need that.

Angela: Make sure Davy warms up and cools down before and after the game. I don’t want him to strain or sprain anything.

Juan: The coach makes sure they do that. Are you done?

Angela: And here’s a first-aid kit in case he skins his knee or gets any other scrapes. We don’t want to risk infection.

Juan: The reason we signed up Davy for organized sports is that all of this is taken care of. There’s even a certified athletic trainer at each game, one of the parents.

Angela: But the other kids can be so rough. He comes home with bruises all the time. I can’t stand seeing him hurt.

Juan: Do you want to come to the game? You can see for yourself that everything is fine.

Angela: How can I watch Davy running into danger? I’d want to run onto the field and save him.

Juan: You’re right. It’s better that you stay here. If you did that, your son would never live it down!

[end of dialogue]

Angela begins our dialogue by saying, “Wait! I need to put sunscreen on Davy before he goes to the game.” Davy, we learn, is a child. Angela wants to put “sunscreen” (sunscreen) on him. Sunscreen is a cream or a liquid that you put on your skin to prevent getting sunburnt – to prevent sunburn, the redness of your skin that is caused by too much sun. People like me, who come from a northern European climate originally (my ancestors, anyway), have to be very careful about sunscreen because I, like many of my fellow Irishmen, often get sunburnt when we go out and stay in the sun too long.

Juan says, however, “It’s not sunny today. He doesn’t need sunscreen.” Juan says the sun isn’t even shining today. You don’t have to worry about that. Angela, however, continues, “And here are four water bottles to make sure he stays hydrated and doesn’t get heatstroke.” “To be hydrated” (hydrated) means to have enough water so that you don’t get sick.

“Heatstroke” (stroke) is a dangerous medical condition caused by the human body getting too hot, and that can happen if you are out in the sun and if you’re not drinking water – at least, that’s what Angela thinks. Juan says, “One of the other parents is bringing drinks for the kids.” In other words, Davy doesn’t need to bring his own water. One of the other parents will bring water.

Angela says, “Make sure Davy warms up and cools down before and after the game.” What Angela means here is that she wants Davy to warm up before the game and cool down after the game. “To warm up” here refers to gradually increasing your physical activity before exercising or playing some sort of sport. Many athletes – people who play sports – warm up before the main activity or the main thing they are doing in their exercising or in their sporting activity.

“To cool down” is to gradually decrease your physical activity when you have finished exercising or playing a sport. Angela explains, “I don’t want him to strain or sprain anything.” “To strain” (strain) means to stretch a muscle so far that you hurt it. You might actually even “tear” (tear) the muscle, which is basically ripping the muscle or causing the muscle to break in some way.

“To sprain” (sprain) means to stretch not a muscle, but what’s called a “ligament.” A “ligament” (ligament) is a tissue, a part of your body, that connects bones. Juan says, “The coach makes sure they do that.” The “coach” (coach) is the person whose job it is to help an athlete or a team perform well and ultimately to win the game that the team or the person is playing.

I can never hear the word “coach” without thinking of my father. The reason is this: my father was a gym teacher, a physical education teacher. He was the teacher in school that taught the kids games and helped them participate in sporting events. Well, he taught in a somewhat small school, a special school, and he was known by all of the children and the adults in the school simply as “Coach.” That’s what they called him. They didn’t say “Mr. McQuillan.” They said “Coach.”

I remember as a child going to his school with him one day and hearing the teachers address him, or talk to him, with the name “Coach.” “Hey, Coach. How is it going today?” “How are you doing, Coach?” I thought, “Why are they calling my father ‘Coach’?” But that’s what they called him for the 34 years that he taught in the St. Paul public schools. But back to our story.

Juan says to Angela, “Are you done?” meaning “Have you finished giving me things and instructing me?” He wants to get going to take Davy to his game. Angela, however, is not finished. She says, “And here’s a first-aid kit in case he skins his knee or gets any other scrapes. We don’t want to risk infection.” A “first-aid (aid) kit (kit)” is a small box that has basic medical supplies in it. It’s something that you would have at a sporting event or a game like this in case you needed to take care of any small medical issues.

One of the things that might happen in a sporting game would be “skinning your knee.” “To skin (skin) your knee (knee)” is to cause the skin around or near your knee to break and to “bleed” (bleed). “To bleed” is to allow blood or to have blood come out of your body. Angela is worried that little Davy is going to skin his knee or get another kind of “scrape” (scrape). A scrape is also an injury to your skin. We might also call it a “cut” or a “scratch” that is caused by having the skin rub up against or touch a sharp surface or object.

Angela says, “We don’t want to risk infection.” “To risk” something is to take the chance that something bad will happen. The bad thing in this case is an “infection” (infection). An infection is when there is something in your body that is causing you pain or making you ill.

Juan says, “The reason we signed up Davy for organized sports is that all of this is taken care of.” Juan is saying to Angela that they “signed Davy up,” meaning they agreed to have Davy participate in this activity, because “all of this is taken care of,” meaning all of these problems that Angela is worried about will be taken care of by the organization that is running this particular sporting activity.

“Organized sports” refers to athletic activity, usually involving teens, that is coordinated and organized by some organizations, some group of people. Juan says, “There’s even a certified athletic trainer at each game, one of the parents.” A “certified athletic trainer” (trainer) would be someone who has some medical knowledge or qualifications that would be sufficient to take care of minor injuries and problems that might happen to one of the players in the game.

Angela is not convinced. She says, “But the other kids can be so rough.” “To be rough” (rough) means to, in this case, play a physical activity or participate in a physical activity that might cause someone to get hurt. Really, it means to play in such a way or in such a manner that would result in someone getting hurt. It can cause people to get injured or hurt – even killed sometimes.

Angela continues, “He comes home with bruises all the time. I can’t stand seeing him hurt.” “Bruises” (bruises) are temporary discolored areas on your skin, usually circles of purple or dark green that are caused by someone hitting himself or someone getting hit, more likely by another person. If, for example, I take my hand and close it up into a ball called a “fist” and hit you hard, it might cause a bruise. Later on, your skin may turn a different color, a dark color.

Angela is complaining that Davy often comes home from these games with bruises. Juan says, “Do you want to come to the game? You can see for yourself that everything is fine.” Angela says, “How can I watch Davy running into danger? I’d want to run out onto the field and save him.” Angela says she can’t go to the game and watch Davy because if she did, she would go out and try to protect her son during the game. Juan then says, “You’re right. It’s better that you stay here. If you did that,” meaning if you went to the game and tried to protect Davy, “your son will never live it down.”

“To live (live) something down” means to have something embarrassing happen to you and then try to continue on with your normal life – when you hope other people have finally forgotten about this embarrassing moment that you have. Usually when we use this expression, it’s with the word “never.” “I will never live that down.” That means that you did something embarrassing or something embarrassing happened to you that everyone will always remember. No one will forget.

Now of course, most people do forget, and we usually worry about our embarrassing moments more than we should. What Juan means here in the dialogue is that if Angela, Davy’s mother, would go to a game and do what she said she might do, which is run out onto the playing field to protect her son, her son would never live that down. Her son would always be embarrassed by what his mother had done.

Now let’s listen to the dialogue, this time at a normal speed.

[start of dialogue]

Angela: Wait! I need to put sunscreen on Davy before he goes to the game.

Juan: It’s not sunny today. He doesn’t need sunscreen.

Angela: And here are four water bottles to make sure he stays hydrated and doesn’t get heatstroke.

Juan: One of the other parents is bringing drinks for the kids. It’s fine. We don’t need that.

Angela: Make sure Davy warms up and cools down before and after the game. I don’t want him to strain or sprain anything.

Juan: The coach makes sure they do that. Are you done?

Angela: And here’s a first-aid kit in case he skins his knee or gets any other scrapes. We don’t want to risk infection.

Juan: The reason we signed up Davy for organized sports is that all of this is taken care of. There’s even a certified athletic trainer at each game, one of the parents.

Angela: But the other kids can be so rough. He comes home with bruises all the time. I can’t stand seeing him hurt.

Juan: Do you want to come to the game? You can see for yourself that everything is fine.

Angela: How can I watch Davy running into danger? I’d want to run onto the field and save him.

Juan: You’re right. It’s better that you stay here. If you did that, your son would never live it down!

[end of dialogue]

Thanks as always to our wonderful scriptwriter, Dr. Lucy Tse.

From Los Angeles, California, I’m Jeff McQuillan. Thank you for listening. Come back and listen to us again right here on ESL Podcast.

English as a Second Language Podcast was written and produced by Dr. Lucy Tse, hosted by Dr. Jeff McQuillan. Copyright 2015 by the Center for Educational Development.

Glossary
sunscreen – a cream or spray that is applied to the skin to prevent sunburn (redness of the skin because of too much exposure to sun)

* Make sure your sunscreen has an SPF of at least 30.

hydrated – with enough water to be healthy and moist

* It’s important to drink extra water or sports drinks when doing heavy exercise on a hot day.

heat stroke – a dangerous medical condition caused by overheating of the human body

* Cases of heat stroke are not surprising when holding a race in 100-degree weather.

to warm up – to gradually increase one’s level of activity when starting a workout, so that one’s muscles are prepared for greater exertion, intended to prevent injury

* At the beginning of the aerobics class, we warmed up with gentle stretching and walking in place.

to cool down – to gradually decrease one’s level of activity when ending a workout, so that one’s heartbeat and breathing can slowly return to normal

* Guillermo was exhausted after the race and wanted to lie down to rest, but his trainer insisted that he cool down first.

to strain – to stretch a muscle too far so that it tears, causing pain and swelling

* I must have strained my back when I lifted those heavy boxes.

to sprain – to stretch a ligament (the connective tissues that connect bones) too far so that it swells, causing pain

* Soccer players often sprain their ankles when they dive after a ball.

coach – a trainer; a person whose job is to help an athlete or a team perform well and win a competition

* The coach requires all her players to run at least three miles per day.

first-aid kit – a small box or container with basic medical supplies to treat injuries, such as bandages, aspirin, a thermometer, tweezers, and more

* This first-aid kit contains an emergency blanket to keep you warm if you get stranded in a snowstorm.

to skin (one’s) knee – to scrape the top layers of skin off of one’s knee, usually because one fell and slid against pavement or a similar rough surface

* Olivia fell off her bike and skinned her knee, but fortunately, she didn’t have any more serious injuries.

scrape – a scratch or cut caused by one’s skin rubbing against a rough or sharp surface

* Little boys’ arms and legs are often covered with scrapes from playing outdoors.

infection – the presence of a virus or bacteria in the body that makes one sick or that causes the skin to redden and warm, often producing a fever and/or pain

* Nolan has a respiratory infection that has made it very difficult for him to breathe on his own, so he will need to spend a few days at the hospital.

organized sport – an athletic activity that involves a team of players following a set of rules

* Basketball, baseball, soccer, football, tennis, and volleyball are all examples of organized sport.

certified athletic trainer – a healthcare professional who works with physicians to prevent and treat injuries among athletes

* The university has hired a certified athletic trainer to help the coach prevent injuries.

rough – not gentle or smooth; involving a lot of careless physical force that may hurt others, although that is not the intention

* That was a rough game of football! More than half the players got injured.

bruise – a temporary, discolored area on the skin, usually purple or dark green, caused by blood vessels breaking under the skin when one is hit by a heavy object

* Vicky walked into a door and now she has a big bruise on her forehead.

to live (something) down – to resume one’s normal life when others have finally forgotten about something embarrassing that happened

* When Kate fell while accepting the award on stage, everyone laughed and she thought she’d never live it down

Comprehension Questions
1. Why do players warm up and cool down?
a) To avoid sunburn
b) To avoid injury
c) To avoid infection

2. Which of these is associated with bleeding?
a) A sprain
b) A scrape
c) A bruise

Answers at bottom.

What Else Does It Mean?
rough

The word “rough,” in this podcast, means not gentle or smooth, and involving a lot of careless physical force that may accidentally hurt others: “Don’t you worry that your dogs are too rough with the baby?” The word “rough” can also be used informally to mean difficult or challenging: “Wow, that exam was rough! I hope I passed.” A “rough night” is a sleepless night, or a night when one didn’t get enough sleep: “The neighbor’s dog kept barking, so we had a rough night.” A “rough patch” refers to a difficult period of time with many problems: “They’re going through a rough patch in their marriage.” Finally, the phrase “to be rough on (someone)” means to criticize someone too much: “It’s important to provide feedback on the employees’ performance, but don’t be too rough on them.”

to live (something) down

In this podcast, the phrase “to live (something) down” means to resume one’s normal life when others have finally forgotten about something embarrassing that happened: “Sam will never live down the day when he accidentally wore his wife’s sweater to work!” The phrase “to live life to the fullest” means to seek maximum enjoyment in life, taking advantage of every opportunity: “In retirement, they’re living life to the fullest, going golfing, hiking, swimming, and boating almost every day.” Finally, the phrase “to live from hand to mouth” means to have very little money, only enough to buy food, and not enough to save: “When Sheila worked part-time and her husband was a full-time student, they were living from hand to mouth.”

Culture Note
Sports Causing the Most Childhood Injuries

The “prevalence” (high frequency) of “concussions” (temporary unconsciousness caused by a mild brain injury when one is hit in the head) among football players is “gaining” (getting; receiving) growing attention from the media and parents, but many other types of sports are just as likely to cause injuries in children. According to the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford University, children and teenagers participating in organized sports experience 3.5 million injuries each year. “Contact sports” (sports that involve physical contact with other players) such as football and hockey are obvious “culprits” (people or things that are responsible or a problem), but all sports have a “potential” (the possibility of something happening) of injury.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission reported the following statistics for children ages 5-14 who were “treated” (received medical care) in hospital emergency rooms in 2009:
? Basketball: more than 170,000 injuries
? Baseball and softball: almost 110,000 injuries
? Bicycling: more than 200,000 injuries
? Football: almost 215,000 injuries
? Soccer: 88,00 injuries

One of the more surprising statistics is that “trampolines” (large, stretchy, elastic surfaces that students jump on repeatedly) led to about 65,000 injuries that year. In 2012, the American Academy of Pediatrics warned against the “recreational” (for fun) use of trampolines at home, because of the high number of injuries.

Comprehension Answers
1 - b

2 - b