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1027 Adding Condiments to Food

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Complete Transcript
Welcome to English as a Second Language Podcast number 1,027 – Adding Condiments to Food.

This is English as a Second Language Podcast episode 1,027. I’m your host, Dr. Jeff McQuillan, coming to you from the Center for Educational Development in beautiful Los Angeles, California.

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In this episode, we’re going to listen to a dialogue between Orlando and Janine about making your food taste better by adding condiments. Let’s get started.

[start of dialogue]

Orlando: Hand me that Worcestershire sauce.

Janine: Here. You’re not putting that on your burger, are you?

Orlando: No, I’m using it for my hot dog.

Janine: Wait. You’ve put ketchup, mustard, mayonnaise, and barbecue sauce on your burger, and now you’re going to put Worcestershire sauce on your hot dog?

Orlando: Sure, you’ve got to have Worcestershire sauce on your hot dog.

Janine: No, I don’t. I don’t know anybody else who puts Worcestershire sauce on their hot dogs.

Orlando: You’re missing out. I just need to add a little steak sauce, horseradish, tartar sauce, and a dab of chili sauce, and this hot dog is ready to eat.

Janine: That sounds disgusting! Is there anything you won’t put on your food?

Orlando: On this food? Maybe maple syrup.

Janine: What?! You’re the one missing out. Hand me that syrup.

Orlando: That is truly revolting!

Janine: To each his own.

[end of dialogue]

Orlando begins this dialogue by saying to Janine, “Hand me that Worcestershire sauce.” “Worcestershire (Worcestershire) sauce (sauce)” is a special kind of liquid made from vinegar, sugar, salt, garlic, what are called “anchovies” – which are basically small fish – and it is used often in cooking beef. Notice that the pronunciation of this word is not like the spelling. You would think it would be pronounced something like “Worchestershire” sauce, but it isn’t. It is from the town of “Worcester” in England, and that’s how it’s pronounced.

So, we say “Worcestershire sauce.” Personally, I don’t really like it, but Orlando does, so Janine says to Orlando, “Here,” meaning “Here, take it.” She’s giving him the bottle. Janine says, “You’re not putting that on your burger, are you?” “Burger” (burger) is the same as “hamburger” – a beef patty that is very popular in the U.S. and other countries. Orlando says, “No, I’m using it for my hot dog.”

A “hot dog” is basically a small sausage that is usually placed inside of a piece of bread called a “bun.” We have “hot dog buns” – bread that is made especially for eating hot dogs – and “hamburger buns.” Janine says, “Wait, you put ketchup, mustard, mayonnaise, and barbecue sauce on your burger, and now you’re going to put Worcestershire sauce on your hot dog?”

Janine mentions several different things that Orlando has put on his hamburger. All of these things that we’ve been talking about, including Worcestershire sauce, are called in general “condiments” (condiments). These are things you put on your food to make them taste better, usually after it is cooked. Some examples of condiments are mentioned here: ketchup, mustard, mayonnaise, and barbecue sauce.

“Ketchup” (ketchup) is a thick red sauce made from tomatoes, vinegar, salt, sugar, and a few other things, that is usually used in the U.S. when you are eating French fries. Some people, like me, love eating French fries, which are deep-fried pieces of potato, with ketchup. Many people, including me, also like to put ketchup on a hamburger to improve its taste.

“Mustard” (mustard) is a thick yellow or brown sauce that is made from mustard seeds as well as vinegar, salt, and a few other things. “Mayonnaise” (mayonnaise) is a thick, white, creamy sauce made by mixing oil and the yellow part of an egg – what we call the “egg yolk” (yolk) – vinegar, lemon juice, and a few other things together, and it produces something wonderful called “mayonnaise.”

Finally, there is “barbecue (barbecue) sauce.” Barbecue sauce is a thick, dark brown liquid that is usually sweet and is used to cook certain kinds of meat on what we call a “barbecue,” which is basically an open flame with a “grill” over it – a series of metal bars that you put the food on. You can put barbecue sauce on chicken, on pork ribs – the piece of meat that comes from a pig. Lots of different things can be used with barbecue sauce. It’s very popular in the U.S. for grilling food outside, especially.

Orlando says, “Sure, you’ve got to have Worcestershire sauce on your hot dog.” Now, I personally never eat this kind of sauce, I think I mentioned, but Orlando wants it on his hot dog. Janine disagrees with Orlando. She says, “No, I don’t,” meaning “I don’t have to have that sauce on my hot dog.” She continues, “I don’t know anybody else who puts Worcestershire sauce on their hot dogs.”

Orlando says, “You’re missing out.” “To miss (miss) out” is to not to experience something – not to have an opportunity to do something or see something that is good or pleasurable. “I missed out on the baseball game last night.” I didn’t have an opportunity to see it. “To miss out” is to lose an opportunity to see or participate in something good. Orlando is telling Janine that she is missing out on the great taste of putting this sauce on hot dogs.

He continues, “I just need to add a little steak sauce, horseradish, tartar sauce, and a dab of chili sauce, and this hot dog is ready to eat.” Orlando gives us another list of condiments that are common with some Americans. The first one is “steak sauce.” “Steak sauce” is a dark brown sauce – made from tomatoes, vinegar, I think raisins, and a few other things – that is sometimes used on steak.

Now, many people think that steak sauce ruins the taste of steak. Other people think that it helps the taste of steak, especially if the steak is somewhat overcooked, I think. I don’t personally use steak sauce on my steak, but if you go to some restaurants in the U.S., they will give you steak sauce with your steak if you want it.

“Horseradish” (horseradish) is a thick, somewhat spicy, white-colored sauce – or, it’s not exactly white, but it’s close to white. It’s made from vinegar and the part of a plant called “horseradish.” There’s a horseradish plant, which I believe is a kind of cabbage. Horseradish sauce is very popular on hot dogs in the U.S. Again, I don’t like it very much, so I don’t put anything on my hot dogs like horseradish.

“Tartar (tartar) sauce” is a thick, creamy, white sauce that is often used with fried seafood – things like fried fish. It’s made from mayonnaise, lemon juice, I believe there’s some pickles in there, as well as other ingredients. Tartar sauce is very common when eating fried fish.

“Chili sauce” is the last thing that Orlando mentions. “Chili (chili) sauce” is a hot sauce usually made from spicy peppers as well as vinegar, salt, and a few other things. It’s usually red. If you like your food spicy, and I don’t, then you could put a dab of chili sauce on it. “A dab” (dab) of something is a little bit. It’s a small amount of something.

Janine, however, says to Orlando, “That sounds disgusting.” When we say something is “disgusting” (disgusting), we mean it is very unappealing. It’s something that would make you sick. It’s something that we might also describe as being “gross” (gross). It’s a very negative way to describe food, in particular. Janine says, “Is there anything you won’t put on your food?”

Orlando says, “On this food?” He says, “Maybe maple syrup.” “Maple” (maple) is a kind of tree which is very popular in Canada. In fact, one of the symbols of Canada, our neighbor to the north, is a maple leaf from the maple tree. From a maple tree, you get something called “maple syrup” (syrup), which is a thick, sweet, brown liquid that is made from maple trees – technically from what is called the “sap” (sap) of a maple tree, which is the liquid inside of a tree.

Maple syrup is often used on breakfast dishes such as pancakes, French toast, and other kinds of breakfast foods. It’s very sweet. Orlando says he wouldn’t put maple syrup on his hot dog or hamburger. Janine is surprised by this. She says, “What? You’re the one missing out,” meaning now you are the one who is missing a good opportunity to taste something good. She says, “Hand me that syrup.”

So Janine, after complaining about all the things that Orlando is putting on his food, is now going to put maple syrup on her hamburger or hot dog. Now that really is very unusual, and Orlando describes how the average American would probably react to that combination of beef and maple syrup by saying, “That is truly revolting.” “Revolting” (revolting) means the same as here as “disgusting” – something that is very gross, especially, again, referring to food.

Janine then ends with a common expression: “To each his own.” “To each his own” means everybody likes something different. Each person has his or her own tastes and what you may like, I may hate. This is true with my wife and me. If she likes something, I usually hate it when it comes to food.

Now let’s listen to the dialogue, this time at a normal speed.

[start of dialogue]

Orlando: Hand me that Worcestershire sauce.

Janine: Here. You’re not putting that on your burger, are you?

Orlando: No, I’m using it for my hot dog.

Janine: Wait. You’ve put ketchup, mustard, mayonnaise, and barbecue sauce on your burger, and now you’re going to put Worcestershire sauce on your hot dog?

Orlando: Sure, you’ve got to have Worcestershire sauce on your hot dog.

Janine: No, I don’t. I don’t know anybody else who puts Worcestershire sauce on their hot dogs.

Orlando: You’re missing out. I just need to add a little steak sauce, horseradish, tartar sauce, and a dab of chili sauce, and this hot dog is ready to eat.

Janine: That sounds disgusting! Is there anything you won’t put on your food?

Orlando: On this food? Maybe maple syrup.

Janine: What?! You’re the one missing out. Hand me that syrup.

Orlando: That is truly revolting!

Janine: To each his own.

[end of dialogue]

If you’re not listening to the dialogues by our scriptwriter, Dr. Lucy Tse, you’re definitely missing out on a wonderful opportunity to improve your English.

From Los Angeles, California, I’m Jeff McQuillan. Thank you for listening. Come back and listen to us again right here on ESL Podcast.

English as a Second Language Podcast was written and produced by Dr. Lucy Tse, hosted by Dr. Jeff McQuillan. Copyright 2014 by the Center for Educational Development.

Glossary
Worcestershire sauce – a fermented (using microorganisms (very small living things) to change something chemically) liquid made with vinegar, sugar, salt, anchovies (small fish), garlic, and other spices, often used when cooking beef

* This beef stew would taste a lot better if you add some Worcestershire sauce.

burger – hamburger; a hot sandwich made by placing a patty of ground beef between two parts of a large round roll (bread) with vegetables and condiments

* After the baseball game, they went out for burgers and fries.

hot dog – a hot sandwich made by placing a sausage between the two halves of a long bun (bread) with condiments

* Whenever they go camping, they eat hot dogs, watermelon, and marshmallows.

ketchup – a thick, red sauce made from tomato sauce, vinegar, sugar, salt, and other spices, often eaten with French fries

* Do you like to put ketchup on your scrambled eggs?

mustard – a thick, spicy yellow or brown sauce made from mustard seeds, vinegar, salt, and other spices

* Shelby cooks pork chops with a mixture of spicy mustard, honey, and rosemary.

mayonnaise – a thick, white, creamy sauce made by mixing oil, egg yolks (the yellow part of an egg), vinegar, lemon juice, and spices

* To make tuna salad, just mix two cans of tuna with some mayonnaise, chopped green onion, and chopped cucumber.

barbecue sauce – a thick, dark brown liquid that is sweet, used to cook meat over a flame, usually made from tomato paste, vinegar, sugar, and spices

* Like many kids, Kian likes to dip his chicken nuggets in honey or barbecue sauce.

to miss out – to not experience something; to not have an opportunity to see or do something that is good or pleasurable

* Beatrix really missed out on a lot of fun by deciding to stay home and study last Friday instead of going out with all of us.

steak sauce – a dark brown sauce made from tomatoes, vinegar, raisins, and other spices, often used on steak

* When Chuck had to stop eating meat for health reasons, he tried flavoring tofu with steak sauce.

horseradish – a thick, spicy, off-white colored sauce made from vinegar and the root of the horseradish plant

* Aubrey loves adding horseradish to mashed potatoes to make them more interesting.

tartar sauce – a thick, creamy, white sauce that is often eaten with fried seafood, made from mayonnaise, lemon juice, chopped pickles, and other ingredients

* Fried shrimp has a lot of fat, and dipping it in tartar sauce adds even more calories and fat.

a dab of – a little bit of; the amount of something dropped from one spoon onto a plate or another food

* They put a dab of whipped cream on each slice of cake.

chili sauce – hot sauce; a spicy, red liquid made from spicy peppers, vinegar, salt, and other ingredients

* Leo put so much chili sauce on his food that he thought his mouth was on fire!

disgusting – gross; revolting; very unappealing; making one feel sick or nauseous

* Don’t eat food that has fallen onto the ground. That’s disgusting!

maple syrup – a thick, sweet, brown liquid made from the sap (liquid inside a tree) of maple trees, often eaten on pancakes, French toast, and other breakfast foods

* Do you want maple syrup or blackberry syrup on your pancakes?

revolting – disgusting; gross; very unappealing and making one want to throw up

* Eating bugs may seem revolting, but they are a very good and inexpensive source of protein.

Comprehension Questions
1. Which of these sauces is most commonly eaten with seafood?
a) Barbecue sauce
b) Tartar sauce
c) Chili sauce

2. Which of these sauces is the spiciest?
a) Ketchup
b) Steak sauce
c) Horseradish

Answers at bottom.

What Else Does It Mean?
to miss out

The phrase “to miss out,” in this podcast, means to not experience something, or to not have an opportunity to see or do something that is good or pleasurable: “I know you’re on a diet, but don’t you want to try this cake? You’re missing out!” The phrase “to miss the point” means to not understand someone’s main idea: “When you focus on such tiny details, you miss the point!” The phrase “to miss the boat” means to not take advantage of an opportunity: “We really missed the boat when we chose not to invest in our computer company 20 years ago.” Finally, the phrase “to miss the mark” means to not reach one’s goals or to not be successful: “Last year, our sales figures missed the mark, so we’ll have to try twice as hard this year.”

a dab of

In this podcast, the phrase “a dab of” means a little bit of, or the amount of something dropped from one spoon onto a plate or another food: “Add a dab of honey to sweeten the batter.” Or, “Do you want a dab of butter on your toast?” As a verb, “to dab at (something)” means to touch something lightly or gently, especially with a cloth: “Hazel looked in the mirror and dabbed her lipstick with a tissue.” Finally, the phrase “to dab (something) onto (something)” means to put something onto a surface with many quick movements: “Dab this anti-wrinkle cream under your eyes before bedtime each night.” Or, “The mechanic dabbed some oil onto the axel to make it turn more smoothly.”

Culture Note
The Development of Ketchup

Ketchup has a long “culinary” (related to food and cooking) history, and it has “undergone” (experienced) many changes over time. A “recipe” (instructions for making a particular type of food) for the tomato-based ketchup that most Americans are familiar with today first appeared in writing in a cookbook in 1801. But ketchup was not sweetened until the 19th century.

For many years, Americans feared that “raw” (uncooked) tomatoes were not safe for “consumption” (eating). They preferred to cook their tomatoes, so ketchup “fit the bill” (seemed appropriate and met their needs). Ketchup was first distributed nationally in the 1830s, and the popular Heinz brand first appeared in 1876. Early advertisements presented “commercial” (made by a company) ketchup as a “time-saver” (something that makes a process faster and easier) for “housewives” (women who do not have a job outside of the home).

Today, food manufacturers continue to “innovate” (make changes and try new ways of doing things) with ketchup products. For example, in 2000, Heinz launched ketchup in bright colors, including green and pink. Many children liked the brightly colored ketchup, but the product was “phased out” (discontinued; no longer available) in 2006. Companies are also innovating in terms of the packaging. Ketchup used to be sold in glass bottles, but it was difficult to get all the ketchup out of the bottle. So companies put ketchup into squeezable plastic bottles, and then they changed the direction of the label so that the opening was at the bottom. That way, the ketchup is always resting against the opening and it is easier to squeeze out.

Comprehension Answers
1 - b

2 - c