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0800 Advertising Jobs on the Internet

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Complete Transcript
Welcome to English as a Second Language Podcast number 800: Advertising Jobs on the Internet.

This is English as a Second Language Podcast episode 800. I’m your host, Dr. Jeff McQuillan, coming to you from the Center for Educational Development in beautiful Los Angeles, California. Eight hundred, I feel so old!

This 800th ESL Podcast has, like all of our current episodes, a Learning Guide, where you can get the transcript for the episode as well as vocabulary definitions, sample sentences, additional definitions, culture notes, and comprehension questions. Go to our website at eslpod.com to become a member and to download the Learning Guide.

This episode is a dialogue between Wendy and Pedro about advertising a job on the Internet. Let’s get started.

[start of dialogue]

Wendy: I’ve just heard that you’re not going to use a recruitment agency to fill the new position.

Pedro: No, I’m not. There are so many Internet job boards out there that I think we can find good candidates without using headhunters.

Wendy: But headhunters do a good job of weeding out people who don’t have the right experience or qualifications.

Pedro: Yes, but they also charge a large commission. I’m going to post an ad on a few major job boards to see what happens. Most of them don’t charge a listing fee so there’s no harm in trying.

Wendy: I predict you’re going to be flooded with applications, and it’s going to take a lot of time to separate the good from the bad.

Pedro: That’s where you come in.

Wendy: What do you mean?

Pedro: You are my assistant, aren’t you?

Wendy: Yes.

Pedro: And your job is to assist me, right?

Wendy: Yes.

Pedro: Good. Roll up your sleeves and get ready for a busy week!

[end of dialogue]

Wendy begins our dialogue by saying to Pedro, “I just heard that you’re not going to use a recruitment agency to fill the new position.” “To recruit” means to find someone to do a job or to become a member of an organization. So, a “recruitment agency” is a company that goes out and finds people for you to hire, people who would be qualified to work in a position that you need to fill. When we use the verb “to fill” (fill) when talking about jobs we mean to hire someone for a particular job, to find someone to work for your company. So, we might talk about “filling a position” – the “position” is the job. “To fill it” is to find someone who you will hire – who you will employ – to work at that job.

Pedro says, “No, I’m not.” I’m not going to use a recruitment agency to fill the new position. He says, “There are so many Internet job boards out there that I think we can find good candidates without using headhunters.” A “job board” is a collection of different jobs and their descriptions. It’s actually more technically a place where you advertise jobs. In the old days, before the Internet, sometimes companies – and I know the government often did this – they would put new job announcements on a physical board in some building, and you could go down and look at the board and look at the new, we would call them, “job postings,” because “to post” means to place a piece of paper or an announcement in a place that other people can see it, as on a big board or wall. You could go and look at these job postings on a job board, which was a physical place in a building that you could go and visit. Well nowadays, we talk about job boards on the Internet, we mean websites where you can go and look for new jobs, because they have descriptions of new jobs placed or posted there.

Pedro says that there are so many Internet job boards “out there,” meaning in existence, “that I think we can find good candidates without using headhunters.” A “candidate” (candidate) is a person who you are thinking about hiring for a job, or a person who wants to be considered for the job that you are hiring for. A “headhunter” is a person whose job it is to find a good person for the job you’re looking for. A lot of times big companies don’t want to go through the time of trying to find a good candidate to fill a position, so they’ll hire a recruitment agency, and the people in the agency will go out and “hunt,” or look for “heads,” people who could work for that company. Many times these are people who are already working at other companies. The headhunter will approach them – will call them and say, “Hey, would you like to work for this company over here?” That’s what a headhunter does; he or she is a recruiter, a person who goes out and finds people for jobs.

Wendy says, “But headhunters do a good job of weeding out people who don’t have the right experience or qualifications.” “To weed (weed) out (someone)” is a two-word phrasal verb meaning to eliminate or get rid of the least desirable members of a large group of items, to only keep the best ones. “We’re going to weed out all of the bad or not qualified candidates.” Sometimes we call them “applicants.” People who apply for a job are people who want to be hired for a job, and so from the verb “to apply” we get the noun “applicant.” So we’re going to weed out the bad or unqualified applicants, or unqualified candidates. “To weed out” means to get rid of the bad ones, and keep the good ones to look at those more closely. “Weed” has a lot of different meanings in English – and I mean a lot of different meanings! Take a look at our Learning Guide for some of those.

So, Wendy is concerned because she thinks the headhunters would do a better job of weeding people out who don’t have the right qualifications – the right abilities or skills. Pedro says, “Yes, but headhunters also charge a large commission.” “They charge” means they make you pay, you have to pay them a certain amount of money. We call the amount of money that they get sometimes a “commission.” A “commission” is a fee or a price that you pay someone to do some sort of service. It’s often a percentage of some other value. For example, if the person’s first year salary is, I don’t know, 50,000 dollars the headhunter may get a one percent fee or a three percent fee, meaning that you have to pay them one percent of their first year salary. I don’t know exactly what the percentages are, but that would be an example of a commission. If you sell a car at a car dealership – a place that sells new and used cars – the salesperson – you – would get a commission. You would get a percentage, so if you sell a more expensive car you get more money because you’re being what we would say “paid on commission,” meaning you get a percentage of the amount that you sell. So 10 percent, obviously, would be more money if you sold a 100,000-dollar car than if you sold a 50,000-dollar car. I’ve never owned a 50,000-dollar car, certainly not a 100,000-dollar car, more like a 15,000-dollar car, that’s – that’s my kind of car!

Anyway, Pedro says that he’s going to post an ad on a few major, or important, job boards to see what happens. “To post,” I mentioned earlier, means to place something somewhere. An “ad” is short for an advertisement. It’s an announcement that asks you to buy something or, in this case, to apply for a job. Pedro says that most of the job boards don’t charge a listing fee so there’s no harm in trying. A “fee” is a price that you pay for something. A “listing fee” is the amount of money you have to pay to post your announcement or your message in a certain place; in this case, on the website. The expression “there’s no harm in trying” is used to show that you may not be doing something that is going to be successful, but it doesn’t matter because there’s no reason not to do it; there’s no price or no cost associated with it. If something good happens, good; if something doesn’t it’s no big deal, it doesn’t matter because it didn’t cost you anything or there’s no bad thing that will happen if you do this thing. That’s what “harm” is; “harm” is a negative consequence of something, something bad that happens. Pedro says, “there’s no harm in trying,” meaning, again, it’s okay, even if it doesn’t work we haven’t lost anything.

Wendy says, “I predict” – I believe this will happen in the future – “I predict you’re going to be flooded with applications.” “To be flooded (flooded) with (something)” means to receive a lot of something, more than you can handle, more than you can take care of. “Applications” are forms or documents or emails from people who want the job you are advertising, who are expressing interest in the job, who are applicants, who are potential candidates for the job. Wendy says, “it’s going to take a lot of time to separate the good from the bad,” meaning the good applications or good candidates from the bad applications.

Pedro says, “That’s where you come in.” This expression, “that’s where you come in,” or “that’s where I come in” or “that’s where he comes in,” is used to identify what another person’s job will be in a certain project that you’re describing. So for example, I have a lot of essays to grade. I’m a teacher; I’m a professor; I have a lot of papers I have to look at. And so I say to my teaching assistant, the person who is helping me teach the class, I say, “Well, I have all these papers to grade, and that’s where you come in,” meaning you’re going to do the work. Pedro is telling Wendy that she’s going to go through these applications and weed out the bad ones.

Wendy says, “What do you mean?” Pedro says, “You are my assistant, aren’t you?” Wendy says, “Yes.” “And your job is to assist me, right?” Pedro says. Wendy says, “Yes.” Pedro says, “Good. Roll up your sleeves and get ready for a busy week!” “To roll (roll) up your sleeves (sleeves)” means to prepare to work very hard. Your “sleeves” are the parts of your shirt or jacket that cover your arms. So if you’re going to roll them up, you’re going to pull them back so that it’s up, maybe halfway up your arm. The idea is that when you’re going to work really hard on something you may need to roll up your sleeves, you may need to put your sleeves back so that your hands are free, your arms are free to work very hard. The expression in general means to prepare to work very hard, and that’s what Wendy is going to have to do.

Now let’s listen to the dialogue, this time at a normal speed.

[start of dialogue]

Wendy: I just heard that you’re not going to use a recruitment agency to fill the new position.

Pedro: No, I’m not. There are so many Internet job boards out there that I think we can find good candidates without using headhunters.

Wendy: But headhunters do a good job of weeding out people who don’t have the right experience or qualifications.

Pedro: Yes, but they also charge a large commission. I’m going to post an ad on a few major job boards to see what happens. Most of them don’t charge a listing fee so there’s no harm in trying.

Wendy: I predict you’re going to be flooded with applications, and it’s going to take a lot of time to separate the good from the bad.

Pedro: That’s where you come in.

Wendy: What do you mean?

Pedro: You are my assistant, aren’t you?

Wendy: Yes.

Pedro: And your job is to assist me, right?

Wendy: Yes.

Pedro: Good. Roll up your sleeves and get ready for a busy week!

[end of dialogue]

Our scriptwriter rolls up her sleeves every day to prepare excellent scripts for us. That’s the wonderful Dr. Lucy Tse I’m talking about. She’s done all 800 of our ESL Podcast dialogues and stories. Thank you, Lucy.

From Los Angeles, California, I thank you for listening. Come back and listen to us again here on ESL Podcast.

English as a Second Language Podcast is written and produced by Dr. Lucy Tse, hosted by Dr. Jeff McQuillan, copyright 2012 by the Center for Educational Development.

Glossary
recruitment agency – a company that helps other companies find qualified people for the jobs they offer

* The recruitment agency says it has found at least six computer programmers who are qualified for the job in our IT department.

to fill – to hire someone for a particular job

* We’re looking for someone with at least five years of experience to fill the National Sales Manager position.

job board – a collection of job descriptions; a place to post (list or advertise) descriptions of job openings

* Do you know of any job boards that are only for healthcare professionals?

candidate – a person who wants to be considered for a particular job, position, or opportunity

* Which candidate are you going to vote for in the presidential elections?

headhunter – a person whose job is to look for people who are qualified for a particular job opening, especially if those people already have jobs somewhere else

* Camilo was really surprised to be contacted by a headhunter, but he doesn’t want to leave his current employer.

to weed out – to eliminate; to get rid of the least desirable items in a large group of items, keeping only the best ones

* Sometimes it is difficult to weed out the lies and identify the truth.

qualifications – the abilities, skills, knowledge, or experience needed to do something well or to be considered for a particular position or job

* The qualifications for this job include spreadsheet skills, the ability to speak at least two languages, and a lot experience working in teams.

commission – a fee paid to someone for a service provided, often calculated as a percentage of some value

* Tricia works on commission, so she gets to keep three percent of all the sales she makes.

to post – to announce something publicly, usually by putting a piece of paper with a written message on a large board with many similar papers, or by uploading a comment or description on a website

* Never post your full name, address, or credit card information on a public website. It isn’t safe.

ad – advertisement; an announcement advertising a product for sale or an opportunity such as a job

* Did you see the ad in today’s newspaper for a sale at the Saturday Market?

listing fee – an amount of money one must pay to have one’s announcement or message included in a list of similar messages

* Does the newspaper charge a listing fee for classified ads?

no harm in trying – a phrase used to show that one realizes one’s actions or plan may not be successful, but one will try anyway because there is no reason not to and nothing bad can happen as a result

* Jason knows he isn’t qualified for the job, but he’s going to apply anyway, because there’s no harm in trying.

to predict – to foresee; to say what one believes will happen in the future

* Nobody predicted our team would do so well this season.

to be flooded with – to receive a lot of something, more than one can handle or process

* After Blake won the lottery, he was flooded with requests for money from nonprofit organizations.

application – the forms, documents, and other information one presents to officially express interest in being considered for a job or another opportunity

* Please remember to include your college transcripts with your application.

that’s where (one) comes in – a phrase used to identify what another person’s role will be in a particular process or project that one is describing

* Professor Maser assigned a lot of essays and the students are supposed to turn them in next week. That’s where his teaching assistants come in. They’re the ones who have to read and grade all the essays.

to roll up (one’s) sleeves – to prepare to work very hard; to get ready to work on a big project

* This weekend, they’re going to roll up their sleeves and paint the entire house.

Comprehension Questions
1. Why doesn’t Pedro want to use a recruitment agency?
a) Because he thinks an agency is too expensive.
b) Because he thinks an agency won’t find qualified candidates.
c) Because he thinks an agency will take too long.

2. Why does Pedro tell Wendy to roll up her sleeves?
a) Because her sleeves are in the way.
b) Because she’s wearing the wrong kind of clothes to work.
c) Because she needs to get ready to work really hard.

Answers at bottom.

What Else Does It Mean?
to weed out

The phrase “to weed out,” in this podcast, means to eliminate or to get rid of the least desirable items in a large group of items, keeping only the best ones: “Once a year, they weed out the old and broken toys in their children’s bedroom.” When talking about gardening, the phrase “to weed” means to pull and remove the small, undesirable plants: “The tomato plants would grow better if we weeded the area around them.” The phrase “like weeds” describes something that there is a lot of, or something that is happening very quickly: “Those kids are growing like weeds!” Or, “New tools filled the garage like weeds.” Finally, the word “weed” is used informally for the illegal drug marijuana: “Did you ever smoke weed when you were a teenager?”

to post

In this podcast, the verb “to post” means to announce something publicly, usually by putting a piece of paper with a written message on a large board with many similar papers, or by uploading a comment or description on a website: “Have you read the comments people posted in response to the article?” The verb “to post” can also mean to send something via the mail: “We posted the check last week, so you should have received it by now.” The phrase “to keep (someone) posted” means to give someone the most up-to-date information: “Please keep me posted on your job hunt.” Finally, the phrase “to post bail” means to pay some amount of money so that one can leave prison during the time before a trial: “Larry was arrested for assault and nobody could post bail, so he had to stay in jail.”

Culture Note
Job Placement Websites

There are many “job placement websites” (websites designed to help employers find new employees and to help individuals find new jobs), but the two most popular “in terms of” (as measured by) the number of visitors are CareerBuilder.com and Monster.com.

These and other job placement websites allow individuals to search for “positions” (jobs) by title, “industry” (field of work), “function” (what one does on the job), location, “keyword” (words that appear in the title or description), “salary range” (the low and high end of possible salary), “employment type” (part- or full-time, temporary or permanent), and more. Each job contains a “complete” (full) description of the job.

Individuals who want to apply for a job can do so online, answering questions and uploading a resume. Individuals can also create a “profile” (basic information about someone) on the websites so that employers can view their qualifications and let them know if they appear to be a good “match” (someone who has what is needed) for the job.

Job placement websites also have many articles with job searching “tips” (suggestions, ideas, and techniques) for “job seekers” (people who are looking for jobs). Other features on the sites can include “salary calculators” that help people determine how much money they can make in a particular city in a particular type of job. Many sites also offer short “quizzes” (tests) that people can take to identify which types of jobs and industries interest them most. Some of the sites also have “forums” (ways to communicate online) for “like-minded” (with similar interests) job seekers to ask and answer questions and support each other.

Comprehension Answers
1 - a

2 - c