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0682 Minor Medical Injuries

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Complete Transcript
Welcome to English as a Second Language Podcast number 682: Minor Medical Injuries.

This is English as a Second Language Podcast episode 682. I’m your host, Dr. Jeff McQuillan, coming to you from the Center for Educational Development in beautiful Los Angeles, California.

Our website is eslpod.com. Go there to download a Learning Guide for this episode and all of our current episodes.

This episode is called “Minor Medical Injuries.” It’s a dialogue between Cherise and Evan using vocabulary about ways that you may be hurt, but not seriously. Let’s get started.

[start of dialogue]

Cherise: Rise and shine! Isn’t it a lovely day? I love getting back to nature. There’s nothing like going camping. How did you sleep?

Evan: That was the most miserable night of my life!

Cherise: Really? What happened?

Evan: I woke up in the middle of the night and thought I heard a bear. I got up, stubbed my toe, and tripped. I have scratches all over my arms, not to mention these bruises on my legs. See?

Cherise: Oh, don’t you know that there aren’t any bears this late in the year?

Evan: How should I have known that? This was my first time camping.

Cherise: All right. Why are you holding your neck like that?

Evan: I couldn’t get comfortable at all sleeping on the ground. I woke up with a crick in my neck.

Cherise: Stop moving around like that or you’ll really hurt yourself.

Evan: Oh, I have a cramp in my shoulder! It hurts!

Cherise: I told you not to twist around like that. Just let it work itself out.

Evan: All of this had to happen to me after getting a stitch in my side and a charley horse hiking five miles yesterday. I’ve had it! I’m going back to civilization.

Cherise: How are you getting there?

Evan: What do you mean? I’m walking.

Cherise: Without food or water? You’d better wait for me or you may end up bear bait after all!

[end of dialogue]

Cherise begins by saying, “Rise and shine! Isn’t it a lovely day?” The expression “rise (rise) and shine (shine)” is a way of saying wake up, it’s time to get up. It was probably more popular among an older generation, but you’ll still hear it sometimes in order to make a joke. Cherise says, “Isn’t it a lovely day (isn’t it a beautiful day)?” meaning it is a beautiful day. She says, “I love getting back to nature.” The expression “to get back to nature” means to spend time outdoors, away from a building or a house, in order to experience this feeling of being in the natural world, maybe by a lake or a river or trees. Cherise says, “There’s nothing like going camping,” and now we understand why she says that, because they are camping. “To go camping” means to spend time outdoors, usually sleeping outdoors, sleeping perhaps in what we would call a “sleeping bag,” which is like a blanket in the form of a big bag that you put yourself into to keep yourself warm. For some additional information on this word “camp” go to our Learning Guide and look under the section What Else Does It Mean.

Cherise says to Evan, “How did you sleep?” Evan says, “That was the most miserable night of my life!” “Miserable” (miserable) means very uncomfortable, very unpleasant; something you don’t want to do because you suffered, it caused you some pain. Cherise says, “Really? What happened?” Evan says, “I woke up in the middle of the night (that is, after the time that most people have fallen asleep) and thought I heard a bear (a large brown or black animal typically, at least in the United States). I got up, stubbed my toe, and tripped.” So, Evan got up, he got up off the ground presumably, we’re guessing, and stubbed his toe. “To stub (stub) your toe” means to hit your foot against something by accident, causing pain in one of your 10 toes that are on your feet. It’s not a serious accident – you don’t break any bones, for example – but it can hurt. In Evan’s case, it caused him to trip (trip). “To trip” means to fall or almost fall when you hit something, usually with your feet. Evan says, “I have scratches all over my arms, not to mention these bruises on my legs.” A “scratch” is a long, thin cut on your skin; a little blood comes out but not very much. A “bruise” (bruise) is a large area on your skin that becomes blue or brown or purple, usually because you hit that part of your body against something, or someone hit you. So, Evan says that he has scratches – cuts – all over his arms, “not to mention these bruises on my legs,” he says. “Not to mention” means in addition I also have this. He has bruises on his legs. “See?” he says to Cherise.

Cherise says, “Oh, don’t you know that there aren’t any bears this late in the year?” Evan says, “How should I have known that?” meaning I had no way of knowing that, because, he says, “This was my first time camping,” the first time that he went camping. Cherise says, “All right. Why are you holding your neck like that?” Evan is holding onto his neck with his hand; he says, “I couldn’t get comfortable at all sleeping on the ground.” “At all” here is used for emphasis, meaning I wasn’t able to get comfortable in any way by sleeping on the ground. Now, I have to agree with Evan. I have gone camping when I was a younger man. I’ve gone camping where we just had a sleeping bag on the ground, in the middle of a forest. It was probably the worst couple of days I have ever had! I am not a camping kind of person, in fact I think you can divide the world into campers and non-campers, and campers should never marry non-campers. Fortunately, I’m a non-camper and so is my wife. I can camp if I’m in like a truck, where I have a regular bed; that’s okay. Camping on the ground, I’ll leave that to the rest of you, meaning I’ll let you guys have fun doing that while I’m sitting in my hotel.

Evan doesn’t like camping, at least he hasn’t had a good experience of it; he fell down, he didn’t sleep well, his neck hurts. Evan says, “I woke up with a crick in my neck.” A “crick (crick) in your neck” is when you have a muscle pain on the side of your neck, sometimes caused by the way that you were sleeping, and it prevents you from turning your head from left to right very easily. If you’re sleeping on the ground without a nice pillow, well then, that may give you a crick in the neck.

Cherise says, “Stop moving around like that or you’ll really hurt yourself.” We’re not sure what Evan is doing here, probably moving his neck. Evan says, “Oh, I have a cramp in my shoulder! It hurts!” A “cramp” (cramp) is a sharp feeling of pain, usually caused by a muscle that won’t relax properly. If you are running or doing some sort of athletic event sometimes you will get cramps; your body will produce a sharp pain in the muscle. It could happen in your arms, it could happen in your legs; this happened to Evan’s shoulder.

Cherise says, “I told you not to twist like that.” “To twist” means to turn or rotate something in a particular direction. You can find other meanings of the word “twist” in our Learning Guide for this episode. Cherise says, “Just let it work itself out.” The expression “to work itself out” means to have a problem fix itself; when something bad happens sometimes it will get better even if you don’t do anything, and that’s what Cherise is telling Evan to do.

Evan says, “All of this had to happen to me after getting a stitch in my side and a charley horse hiking five miles yesterday.” A “stitch (stitch) in your side” is a pain that you feel on one side of your body, usually between your hip or your waist and your arms. It’s often caused by doing too much physical activity, often running is the problem. A “charley horse” (charley) horse (two words) is another word for a cramp, a painful cramp typically in your leg. Evan says, “I’ve had it!” meaning I’m very tired and frustrated about something and I don’t want to do it anymore. Evan doesn’t want to go camping anymore. He says, “I’m going back to civilization.” “Civilization” can mean a particular society over many years that follow similar rules and customs. In this case, it’s really used to indicate somewhere that is not outdoors: a city, a town where there are buildings and hotels and restaurants, a place that has modern comforts and conveniences available.

Cherise says, “How are you getting there?” meaning how are you going to get from where they are now to civilization, as Evan calls it. Evan says, “What do you mean? I’m walking.” Cherise says, “Without food or water?” She says, “You better wait for me.” She’s giving him some advice: you should wait for me to go with you. “Or,” she says, “you may end up bear bait after all!” “You may end up” means that the final result might be that you are bear (like the animal) bait (bait). “Bait” is a small piece of food that’s used to attract an animal, usually so that you can catch it. You put the bait in something called a “trap,” and the animal comes to get the bait, and when it moves the food the trap comes down on the animal to capture it – to keep it there, usually because you’re trying to get rid of it. The most common trap that most people are familiar with would be a mousetrap, trying to rid of mice that are in your house. The traditional bait for that is cheese – because everyone knows that mice love cheese! Cherise is saying that Evan, if he’s not careful, may fall down, get injured, and become bait for a bear – the bear might eat him.

Now let’s listen to the dialogue, this time at a normal speed.

[start of dialogue]

Cherise: Rise and shine! Isn’t it a lovely day? I love getting back to nature. There’s nothing like going camping. How did you sleep?

Evan: That was the most miserable night of my life!

Cherise: Really? What happened?

Evan: I woke up in the middle of the night and thought I heard a bear. I got up, stubbed my toe, and tripped. I have scratches all over my arms, not to mention these bruises on my legs. See?

Cherise: Oh, don’t you know that there aren’t any bears this late in the year?

Evan: How should I have known that? This was my first time camping.

Cherise: All right. Why are you holding your neck like that?

Evan: I couldn’t get comfortable at all sleeping on the ground. I woke up with a crick in my neck.

Cherise: Stop moving around like that or you’ll really hurt yourself.

Evan: Oh, I have a cramp in my shoulder! It hurts!

Cherise: I told you not to twist around like that. Just let it work itself out.

Evan: All of this had to happen to me after getting a stitch in my side and a charley horse hiking five miles yesterday. I’ve had it! I’m going back to civilization.

Cherise: How are you getting there?

Evan: What do you mean? I’m walking.

Cherise: Without food or water? You’d better wait for me or you may end up bear bait after all!

[end of dialogue]

Our dialogues never make you feel miserable. That’s because they’re written by the one, the only, Dr. Lucy Tse.

From Los Angeles, California, I’m Jeff McQuillan. Thank you for listening. Come back and listen to us again here on ESL Podcast.

English as a Second Language Podcast is written and produced by Dr. Lucy Tse, hosted by Dr. Jeff McQuillan, copyright 2011 by the Center for Educational Development.

Glossary
rise and shine – wake up; it’s time to get up

* Rise and shine! It’s time to get out of bed and get ready for school.

to get back to nature – to spend time outdoors and experience a feeling of harmony with the natural world

* I wish we could get back to nature without dealing with bugs

to go camping – to spend time outdoors, sleeping in a sleeping bag or in a tent

* When we go camping, we usually sit around a big fire at night.

miserable – very unpleasant and uncomfortable; something one does not want to repeat because one suffered while doing it

* Daniel was miserable the whole time he had the flu.

to stub (one’s) toe – to hit one’s foot against something by accident, causing pain

* The kids forgot to clean up their toys last night, so I stubbed my toe against their toy cars when I walked to the bathroom in the dark.

to trip – to fall or almost fall when one hits something with one’s foot

* Watch where you’re going, or you might trip over this uneven pavement.

scratch – a long, thin, shallow line cut into one’s skin so that a little bit of blood appears

* Did you get those scratches on your arm from playing with the cat?

bruise – a large, discolored area on one’s skin, often blue, brown, or purple, caused by hitting part of one’s body against something, usually by accident

* Kaitlin has a bruise from where she was hit by a baseball.

crick in (one’s) neck – an uncomfortable feeling in the muscles on the side of one’s neck, often affecting one’s ability to turn one’s head

* They bought a new mattress, hoping that it would prevent James from getting a crick in his neck.

cramp – a feeling of pain caused by a muscle that will not relax

* After paddling the canoe all morning, Sheila had a horrible cramp in her arm.

to twist – to rotate something in one direction

* When you play tennis, try not to twist your wrist as you swing the racket.

to work itself out – for a problem to fix itself; for something bad to correct itself without needing help

* The project is behind schedule, but I’m sure everything will work itself out by next week.

a stitch in (one’s) side – a pain felt on the side of one’s body between one’s hip and arm, often cause by doing too much of a physical activity, especially running

* Whenever I run for more than one mile, I get a stitch in my side.

charley horse – a painful cramp in a large muscle, especially in one’s leg

* If you don’t stretch before exercising, you’re more likely to get a charley horse.

to have had it – to be very tired of something or frustrated with something and not want to do or have any more of it

* I get so many spam messages in this email account that I’ve had it! I’m going to open a new account with a different company.

civilization – a place and time where people live together, often in cities, following certain societal rules and ways of behaving and enjoying certain technologies and comforts

* The Harveys try to escape civilization at least once a year, staying in a cabin in the woods without electricity or running water.

bait – a small piece of food or something sweet used to attract an animal, often so that one can catch it

* Do you think cheese or peanut butter would be better bait for this mousetrap?

Comprehension Questions
1. Why was Evan’s night miserable?
a) Because he didn’t bring his pillow.
b) Because he was very uncomfortable.
c) Because he fell while walking in the dark.

2. What happened to Evan while hiking five miles?
a) The seam on his shirt ripped.
b) He couldn’t stop laughing.
c) His muscles started hurting.

Answers at bottom.

What Else Does It Mean?
to camp

The verb “to camp,” in this podcast, means to spend time outdoors, sleeping in a sleeping bag or in a tent: “Do you want to go camping this weekend?” A “camp” is a place where young people go for a period of time during vacations from school: “Melba wants to go to tennis camp.” A “day camp” is a camp that has activities for children only during the day, so that the children go home at night: “Sofia is too young for summer camp, but her parents enrolled her in a day camp instead.” A “fat camp” is a camp where overweight people learn how to eat better and exercise more: “Coco lost more than 20 pounds at fat camp last summer, and we hardy recognized him!” Finally, a “concentration camp” is a place where prisoners are treated very badly: “Have you read about the Auschwitz concentration camp?”

to twist

In this podcast, the verb “to twist” means to rotate something in one direction: “Felipe twisted his head to see what was happening in the row of seats behind him.” The phrase “to twist (one’s) wrist/ankle” means to move one’s body part in a way that causes an injury: “Linnae twisted her ankle when she tripped over the hole, and now she needs to make an appointment with her doctor.” The phrase “to twist (someone’s) arm” means to persuade or convince someone to do something he or she does not want to do: “If you want to go get some ice cream, just say so! You don’t need to twist my arm!” Finally, the phrase “to twist the knife in the wound” means to do something that makes a situation worse, or to hurt someone more than he or she is already hurting: “I already feel bad about what happened, so anything you say will just twist the knife in the wound.”

Culture Note
A “first aid kit” is a small box that has emergency medical “supplies” (things that are used for a particular purpose). First aid kits are often a white metal box “marked” (with a particular symbol or image) with a large red “cross” (two lines that intersect each other at 90 degrees). Some first aid kits are small enough to be carried in a purse or backpack. Others are larger and are put on the wall in a classroom or bus where people will be able to find them in an emergency.

Most first aid kits contain “gauze” (soft, absorbent cloth used to absorb blood) and “adhesive tape” (long pieces of plastic or fabric that are sticky on one side, used to attach gauze to one’s body). They also have “adhesive bandages” (soft cloth with tape at the ends to stick to one’s body) and “elastic bandages” that can be “wrapped” (placed around something to cover it) around injured wrists, ankles, or knees.

Fist aid kits also have “common” (typical; not unusual) medicines, like “aspirin,” which is a “pain-killer” (medicine that reduces pain), and “anti-inflammatory agents” (medicines that decrease irritation and swelling). They also have “antibiotic” (killing bacteria) “ointments” (creams), as well as “gloves” (cloth or plastic pieces worn over one’s hands) to protect the person who is providing medical treatment.

More “elaborate” (fancy, with many pieces) first aid kits also have “space blankets” (small blankets that fold up very small but keep someone very warm), “cold compresses” (a packet that can be opened or bent to produce coldness), scissors, a “thermometer” (a device used to measure one’s body temperature), and more.

Comprehension Answers
1 - b

2 - c