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0629 Being Hungry and Full

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Welcome to English as a Second Language Podcast number 629: Being Hungry and Full.

This is English as a Second Language Podcast episode 629. I’m your host, Dr. Jeff McQuillan, coming to you from the Center for Educational Development in beautiful Los Angeles, California.

Our website is eslpod.com. You probably know that, but did you know you can download a Learning Guide for this episode, an 8- to 10-page guide that will help you improve your English even faster by giving you all of the vocabulary, definitions, sample sentences, additional definitions, comprehension questions, cultural notes, and – best of all – a complete transcript of everything we say on this episode?

This episode is a dialogue between Steve and Brandy about being hungry. Let’s eat – I mean let’s get started!

[start of dialogue]

Steve: I’m finally home and I’m hungry. What’s for dinner?

Brandy: I’m making a new dish. I think you’re really going to like it.

Steve: Oh, good. Bring it on.

Brandy: Well, I miscalculated the cooking time a little and it’s going to take longer than I originally planned. I know you’re famished. Here’s a snack for you to munch on while you wait.

Steve: I’m half-starved. I skipped lunch and had to work late.

Brandy: I know, but I also know you’re dying for something really good. I promise that it’ll be worth the wait.

Steve: Okay, but I could eat a horse right now. Bring me something else to snack on.

Brandy: Don’t be too greedy and eat too much. I don’t want you to spoil your appetite. I know that what I’m cooking is something you’ve been craving for a long time, and you want to save your appetite for it.

Steve: All right. I’ll wait. How much longer will it be?

Brandy: Oh, maybe another hour or a little longer…

Steve: Another hour?! I’ll be dead and buried by then!

[end of dialogue]

Steve begins by saying, “I’m finally home and I’m hungry (I want to eat). What’s for dinner?” Brandy says, “I’m making a new dish. I think you’re really going to like it.” “Dish” here means a type of food, food that is part of what you are eating for your dinner or lunch or any meal. “Dish” has a couple of meanings in English; take a look at the Learning Guide for some additional explanations.

Steve says, “Oh, good. Bring it on.” This phrase, “bring it on,” is used to show that you are very interested in something, you’re very anxious, excited about something happening; you want it to happen right away. Sometimes it’s used in a competition, when somebody says, “I’m going to beat you at basketball,” and you say, “Bring it on,” meaning okay, I accept your challenge. I think I can beat you, that’s the general idea.

Brandy says, “Well, I miscalculated the cooking time a little and it’s going to take longer than I originally planned.” “To miscalculate” is the opposite of “to calculate” in some way; it means to make a mistake in your calculations – to make a mistake in your math, in adding or subtracting. Or in this case, really, in estimating the amount of time it will take for the food to cook. So miscalculate, not actually the opposite, but really means to calculate poorly, to do a bad job at calculating.

Brandy did a bad job of calculating the “cooking time,” the amount of time needed for the food to cook, so it’s going to take longer than she had planned. She says, “I know you’re famished.” “To be famished” means to be extremely hungry, to be very, very hungry. We sometimes use this word to talk about a situation where a country or an area doesn’t have enough food for the people to survive; we would call that a “famine” (famine). “To be famished,” although it appears to be a related word, usually just means in normal conversation to be extremely hungry, to be very, very, very hungry.

Brandy says that she knows Steve is famished. She says, “Here’s a snack for you to munch on while you wait.” A “snack” (snack) is a small amount of food that you eat in between your meals. Usually it’s something sweet – something good to eat. In this case, Brandy gives Steve a snack to munch on. “To munch (munch) on (something)” means to eat food, sometimes very noisily – very loudly, and typically it’s used when we are talking about snacks. So you invite some friends over to watch a movie at your house, and you get some popcorn and maybe some pretzels, other kinds of snacks, and people watch the movie while munching on the snacks. You’re eating the snacks slowly, but it’s not a formal meal.

Steve says, “I’m half-starved.” This is the same as famished; I am extremely hungry. He says, “I skipped lunch and had to work late.” “To skip” (skip) means not to do something you would normally do. “I’m going to skip my exercise this morning because I got up late.” I normally exercise in the morning, but because I was late I’m going to skip it today. “Skip” has several meanings in English, all of which – well, some of which can be found in the Learning Guide.

Brandy says, “I know (I know that you are half-starved), but I also know you’re dying for something really good.” When somebody says, “I’m dying (dying) for (something)” they mean they want something, they desire something a lot, with a very strong emotion. “I’m dying for some pizza.” I really want pizza. So, you want something very badly. You could be dying for a new car or dying for a new dress.

Steve is dying for something really good to eat. Brandy says, “I promise that (the meal; the food) will be worth the wait.” When someone says something is “worth the wait” (wait) they mean it’s so good that it is something you’ll want to wait perhaps a long time for. You don’t really want to wait, but it’s so good that you will wait and you will be happy when you are able, in this case, to eat the food. But many things could be worth the wait: a movie, a book that you have been waiting for to be published, and so forth.

Steve says, “Okay, but I could eat a horse right now.” This is an informal expression, “I could eat a horse,” to show that you are very hungry and could eat a lot of food. A “horse,” of course, is an animal that you ride on; it’s a large animal, I think that’s the idea. Most people don’t eat horses actually here in the United States. I’ve never had horsemeat. I hear it tastes like chicken!

Brandy says, “Don’t be too greedy and eat too much.” Steve has asked to have something else to snack on – to eat as a snack, but Brandy says, “Don’t be too greedy” (greedy). “To be greedy” means to want too much of something, to want more than what you actually need. That’s to be greedy. Brandy says, “I don’t want you to spoil your appetite.” “To spoil (spoil) your appetite” means to eat a lot of things before the main meal so that when the main meal comes you’re not hungry anymore. If you have some snacks and some fruit, and you eat some things at, say, three o’clock in the afternoon, well when you go to dinner at six or seven o’clock you may not be hungry – you’ve spoiled your appetite. “Appetite” is the desire to eat food. “To spoil” means to ruin, to make something go bad.

Brandy says, “I know that what I’m cooking is something you’ve been craving for for a long time.” “To crave” (crave) means to want something very much, to want something very badly, especially food. We talked about “I’m dying for (something),” “to crave” means the same thing but is usually used when talking about food: “I crave a piece of pumpkin pie.” Brandy says, “you’ll want to save your appetite for” what she’s cooking. “To save your appetite” means you’re not going to eat something now so that later you have what we would call a big appetite; you have a strong desire to want to eat a lot of food later. It’s in some ways the opposite of spoiling your appetite. You’re saving your appetite; you’re not eating so that you will be hungrier in the future.

Steve says, “All right. I’ll wait. How much longer will it be?” How much longer will it take until the food is ready? Brandy says, “Oh, maybe another hour or a little longer.” Steve says, “Another hour?!” He’s not very happy. He says, “I’ll be dead and buried by then!” This expression, “to be dead and buried,” is used to emphasize that something will take too long, so long that I will have died by the time it is completed. Of course, Steve won’t actually be dead and buried; it’s just an informal way of saying a very long time. “To bury” here means to put the body in the ground. Of course, Steve should be thankful that he has such a good wife that will spend all that time and make sure that he has a good dinner. Instead of complaining, he should be thanking her. Am I right ladies, huh? Thank you!

Now let’s listen to the dialogue, this time at a normal speed.

[start of dialogue]

Steve: I’m finally home and I’m hungry. What’s for dinner?

Brandy: I’m making a new dish. I think you’re really going to like it.

Steve: Oh, good. Bring it on.

Brandy: Well, I miscalculated the cooking time a little and it’s going to take longer than I originally planned. I know you’re famished. Here’s a snack for you to munch on while you wait.

Steve: I’m half-starved. I skipped lunch and had to work late.

Brandy: I know, but I also know you’re dying for something really good. I promise that it’ll be worth the wait.

Steve: Okay, but I could eat a horse right now. Bring me something else to snack on.

Brandy: Don’t be too greedy and eat too much. I don’t want you to spoil your appetite. I know that what I’m cooking is something you’ve been craving for a long time, and you want to save your appetite for it.

Steve: All right. I’ll wait. How much longer will it be?

Brandy: Oh, maybe another hour or a little longer…

Steve: Another hour?! I’ll be dead and buried by then!

[end of dialogue]

Our scripts are always worth the wait. That’s because they’re written by our very own Dr. Lucy Tse. Thank you, Lucy.

From Los Angeles, California, I’m Jeff McQuillan. Thank you for listening. Come back and listen to us next time on ESL Podcast.

English as a Second Language Podcast is written and produced by Dr. Lucy Tse, hosted by Dr. Jeff McQuillan, copyright 2010 by the Center for Educational Development.

Glossary
hungry – wanting to eat; with a feeling of discomfort or pain in one’s stomach because it is empty

* If I don’t eat a good breakfast, I’ll probably be really hungry by lunchtime.

dish – one type of food; food cooked in a certain way; part of a meal

* Beef stroganoff is one of Jun’s favorite dishes.

bring it on – a phrase used to show that one is ready and eager for something and wants it to happen or begin right away

* When Guadalupe asked if I wanted to see her new designs, I said, “Bring it on!”

to miscalculate – to make an error or mistake in one’s calculation, arriving at a number that is smaller or bigger than it should be

* Hazel miscalculated the cost of her purchases and didn’t have enough cash to pay for everything.

cooking time – the amount of time needed for something to finish cooking and be ready to eat

* This casserole requires just 10 minutes of preparation time, but almost two hours of cooking time.

famished – extremely hungry; very, very hungry

* After running the marathon, Hugh was famished and wanted to eat everything!

snack – a small amount of food eaten between meals

* Most children eat a snack after coming home from school, because they can’t wait until dinnertime.

to munch on – to eat food, often as a snack between meals, and often very noisily

* Chew with your mouth closed! I can hear you munching on that carrot in the other room!

half-starved – extremely hungry; almost dying of hunger

* You look half-starved! Don’t you eat enough at college?

to skip – to not do or have something that one normally would

* Xavier skipped class to go skiing today.

dying for (something) – wanting to have or do something very badly; with a strong desire to do or have something

* I slept for only two hours last night, so I’m dying for a cup of coffee.

worth the wait – good enough to wait a long time for; something that is good enough so that one is not angry that one had to wait a long time for it

* The restaurant is so full that there won’t be a table for us for at least 30 minutes. Do you think the food will be worth the wait, or should we go to a different restaurant?

I could eat a horse – a phrase used to show that one is very hungry and wants to eat a lot

* After hiking all day, I was so hungry I could eat a horse!

greedy – wanting too much of something; wanting and/or taking much more of something than one actually needs

* Don’t be greedy and eat the whole box of cookies! Save some for your brothers and sisters.

to spoil (one’s) appetite – to eat a lot of something before a meal so that one no longer feels hungry once the food is ready

* Whenever Edie goes to a restaurant, he always spoils his appetite by eating too much bread while waiting for his food to be served.

to crave – to want something very badly; to have a very strong desire for something, especially to eat a particular food

* When Lupita was pregnant, she craved pickles, grapefruit, and ice cream.

to save (one’s) appetite – to not eat something right now so that one will still be hungry later when something else is served

* Eat only a small lunch and save your appetite, because we’re going to have a big, fancy dinner tonight.

dead and buried – a phrase used to emphasize that something is taking too long and won’t be ready or finished for a very long time, until someone has already died

* There may be flying cars someday, but we’ll all be dead and buried before then.

Comprehension Questions
1. Why is Steve so hungry?
a) Because he has been on a diet.
b) Because he didn’t eat lunch.
c) Because his lunch wasn’t very good.

2. Why does Steve say that he “could eat a horse”?
a) Because he’s looking forward to trying horsemeat.
b) Because he’s extremely hungry.
c) Because he could eat as much as a horse.

Answers at bottom.

What Else Does It Mean?
dish

The word “dish,” in this podcast, means one type of food, or food cooked in a certain way as part of a meal: “This restaurant specializes in Mediterranean dishes.” A “side dish” is a small amount of food served with the main food in a meal: “Whenever they eat pork chops, they always have mashed potatoes and broccoli as side dishes.” A “dish” is also a plate or bowl used for serving food: “I accidentally broke one of your plates while I was washing the dishes.” A “soap dish” is a small, flat piece of plastic or ceramic with raised sides that is placed next to a sink, usually in a bathroom, and used to hold a bar of soap: “Their bathroom is decorated with a matching soap dish and toothbrush holder.”

to skip

In this podcast, the verb “to skip” means to not do or have something that one normally would: “Normally Marie takes her pill twice a day, but today she skipped the morning dosage.” The verb “to skip” also means to move so that each foot alternates performing a quick step and a small jump: “The little girls skipped through the park.” The phrase “to skip town” means to leave a place when one doesn’t want to be found, usually because one has broken the law: “The accountant stole all their money and then skipped town.” Finally, the phrase “to skip stones” means to throw flat, round rocks into a lake or river so that they jump up several times: “They spent a lazy afternoon at the lake, skipping stones.”

Culture Note
At a restaurant, someone who isn’t very hungry might want to order “light fare,” or smaller “portions” (the amount of food intended for one person to eat at one time). The “senior menu,” for people who are at least 50 years old, and the “kids menu,” for children under 12, offer smaller portions. Many restaurants have a “lunch menu” that serves smaller portions of regular dinner “entrées” (main dishes), but the lunch menu is usually available only in the middle of the day.

“Diners” (people who eat at a restaurant) who are very hungry might look for “menu offerings” (things listed on a menu) that are described as a “generous portion” (very large). They might also consider ordering something that is intended for two or more people to share, such as “fajitas for two” or “nachos to share.”

At the grocery store, some foods are “labeled” (with written information on the packaging) as “hungry-man size” meaning that the portion is large enough to “satisfy” (make someone feel full and content) someone with a large “appetite” (desire to eat food). Very large candy bars are often described as “king size,” meaning that they are larger than the regular size. Other items, like crackers and cookies, are sometimes sold in a “jumbo pack” (a very large container with more of something than other sizes) or “family size” (a large container meant to be sold to a large family, not just one person).

Other products at the grocery store are meant for people who live alone or who are dieting. Many things are “individually packaged,” meaning that each portion has separate packaging. Sometimes this is also called “single-serving packaging.” In recent years, “100-calorie packs” have become popular among dieters, because each package has only 100 calories’ worth of a particular food.

Comprehension Answers
1 - b

2 - b