Daily English
Cultural English
Practical English

0215 Getting a Men’s Haircut

访问量:
Complete Transcript
Welcome to English as a Second Language Podcast number 215, “Getting a Men’s Haircut.”

This is English as a Second Language Podcast episode 215. I'm your host, Dr. Jeff McQuillan, coming to you from the Center for Educational Development in beautiful Los Angeles, California.

If you haven't visited our website recently, go to eslpod.com. We have some exciting new things on our website. If you are listening to this podcast and there are some words you don't understand or if you want to review the words that we go over in the podcast, a good way to do that is by getting the Learning Guide for this episode. That's a 10-page guide that includes the complete transcript of this episode. It also includes all of the words, definitions, sample sentences and culture notes related to this episode.

Today's podcast is called, “Getting a Men’s Haircut.” Let's go!

[Start of story]

It’s been almost three months since I got a haircut and I went to the barbershop where I always get it cut. But when I got there, the barbershop had been replaced by a hair salon.

Shinobu: Hi, I used to get my hair cut at the barbershop that was here.

Nicole: Yeah, they closed. We’ve been open for about a month. I can cut your hair.

Shinobu: Uh...I guess that’s okay.

Nicole: Why don’t you come over here and sit down. What do you have in mind?

Shinobu: Well, as you can see, my hair is pretty curly. When it’s long, it looks like an Afro. I want it to be a lot shorter, but I don’t want a buzz cut.

Nicole: Are you sure you want to cut it? If you keep it long, you could have great dreadlocks.

Shinobu: Uh, I’m not sure that that style would work for me.

Nicole: Okay, then. How about if I cut it short on the sides, leave the bangs medium length, and then keep the back long?

Shinobu: No, I don’t think that would work, either. I’d like it an inch off the collar in back, above the ears, no sideburns, with a part down the right side. I really just need a trim.

Nicole: Hmm…how about if I shave your head? You’d look great bald.

Shinobu: No! I definitely don’t want that. You know what, I just remembered that I’m supposed to be somewhere else right now.

Nicole: Oh, are you sure? I’m sure I know exactly what you want.

Shinobu: I’m sure you do, but I really have to go.

I left that hair salon as quickly as I could. Who knows what would have happened if I’d stayed there? She may have given me a Mohawk!

[End of story]

We're getting our hair cut in this episode of the podcast. The story begins with Shinobu saying that, “It has been almost three months since” he had his hair cut last and he goes to a “barbershop where” he “always gets it cut.” A barbershop, “barbershop,” all one word, is a place where men get their hair cut. A barber is the person who cuts the hair, and a barbershop is the place where you go to get a haircut, especially if you're a man.

The story continues by Shinobu saying that the barbershop was gone when he went back and it “had been replaced by a hair salon.” A hair salon, “salon,” is a place where women get their hair cut, although men can also get their hair cut, sometimes, at a hair salon. Many men do, especially men who live in big cities where the man is concerned about his hair and how it looks. We have a special cultural note in our Learning Guide today about those kind of men. Take it look at that. I think you'll find it interesting.

The dialogue begins with Shinobu saying to Nicole, the woman who works at the hair salon, that he “used to get” his “hair cut at the barbershop.” Nicole says that the barbershop is closed, but that she can cut his hair. Now, you can tell Shinobu is not quite sure he wants her to cut his hair, but he says okay. Nicole then asks him to come and sit down and then says, “What do you have in mind?” meaning what are you thinking? What are your ideas?

Shinobu says, “Well, my hair is pretty curly.” When we say hair is curly, “curly,” we mean it's not straight. It's like in little circles. Curly is the opposite of straight hair. Shinobu says that when his hair is “long, it looks like an Afro.” An Afro, “Afro,” is when you have very curly hair that sticks out of your head. that comes out of your head, almost like a stick, and so you have this big bowl, almost, of hair above you. This was a hairstyle popular in the 1960’s, especially among some African American men.

Well, Shinobu says that he wants his hair cut short, but he doesn't “want a buzz cut.” A buzz, “buzz,” cut is when your hair is cut very close to your head. that you only have just little bit of hair. The reason it is called a buzz cut is because normally it is done with an electric razor. A razor, “razor,” is the little machine that has like scissors in it, we would call them blades, “blades” - those are the things that actually cut the hair - and an electric razor makes a sound that sounds like “buzzzzz,” and so it's called a buzz cut. And, it is something that when you join the military - the army, for example, in the United States - you are given a buzz cut. They cut off all your hair and get it very short. It's not the same as taking all of the hair off. They leave a little bit of hair on your head. My father, when we were growing up, used to cut our hair with a buzz cut. He would have an electric razor and he would just take our hair off, just like we were in the army.

Well, Nicole says, “Are you sure you want to cut” your hair? She suggests to Shinobu that he “keep it long,” and he “could have great dreadlocks.” Dreadlocks, “dreadlocks,” one word, is when you have long hair, long curly hair, but it goes down. It's like having strings of hair that go down towards your shoulder. You can think of the famous reggae musicians, such as Bob Marley. He had a...he had dreadlocks.

Well, Shinobu says that he doesn't think that is a good idea for him. Nicole suggests then that she cut his hair “short on the sides,” leaving “the bangs medium and the back long.” When we talk about the sides we mean the part of the head above the ear, between the ear and the top of the head on the right side and the left side. The bangs, “bangs,” are the hairs that go over the top of your head, the forehead, or front of your head. That word, bangs, has many different meanings in English, look at the Learning Guide for some additional definitions of that.

Shinobu says that he doesn't think that's a good idea either. He says, “I don't think that would work.” I don't think it would look good on me. He tells Nicole that he wants the hair “an inch off the collar.” The collar, “collar,” is actually the top of your shirt. So, when he says to Nicole I want “it an inch off the collar,” he means he wants it an inch above the collar, that the hair should stop one inch above his collar. When I was in high school, this was the rule, that all of the boys had to have their hair cut one inch above the collar. No long hair was allowed.

He also says that he wants the hair cut “above the ears,” meaning that there should be no hair covering the ears. He says he wants “no sideburns.” Sideburns, “sideburns,” one word, is hair that goes on the side of your face, left side and right side, but it goes down like a line down the sides of your face. This was a very popular style back in the 1970’s, to have sideburns. Well, Shinobu says he does not want to have sideburns, he wants “a part down the right side.” A part, “part,” is the line in the hair where you divide it. So, you comb it one way on one side of the part and another way on the other side of the part. You can have a part down the middle. You can have a part down the right side of your head or the left side of your head. That word, part, has many different meanings in English. Again, look at today's Learning Guide for some additional definitions of that word.

Shinobu says, he “really just” wants “a trim.” When you go to the barbershop or hair salon and say you want a trim, “trim,” you're saying you just want your hair cut a little. You're not looking to have the whole thing done.

Nicole says, “how about if I shave your head? You’d look great bald.” How about means do you like this idea or do you want me to shave your head? To shave, “shave,” means to remove all of your hair so you have no hair at all. Usually you have to use a razor, what we would call a hand razor that has one blade that...or two blades that cut the hair right to your skin. And, if you do that, if you have no hair, we say you are bald, “bald.” If you want to see what bald looks like, just take a look at the ESL Podcast Special Edition, our one year anniversary video, and you will see what a bald head looks like.

Shinobu says that he doesn't want to have his head shaved. He realizes that this was not a good idea to go to the hair salon, so he gives Nicole an excuse. He says, “I just remembered that I’m supposed to be somewhere else right now.” This is kind of a typical excuse that you would tell someone if you want to leave right away. “Oh, I have to go!” I have to be somewhere else right now. I'm supposed to be somewhere else right now.

Nicole says, “Oh, are you sure? I know exactly what you want,” and Shinobu says that he has to go. At the end of the dialogue he says that he's not sure what would have happened if he had stayed at the hair salon. He says maybe she would give him a Mohawk. A Mohawk, “Mohawk,” is a style of hair, a haircut where you shave the head on the sides but you leave an inch or two of hair going down the middle of your head. It's called a Mohawk after an American Indian tribe, the Mohawk tribe, although actually it was not the style used by the Mohawks. That’s a mistake, but we still call it a Mohawk. This was very popular in the late 1970’s among punk rockers, musicians who played punk style of rock music.

Now let's listen to the dialogue, this time at a native rate of speech.

[Start of story]

It’s been almost three months since I got a haircut and I went to the barbershop where I always get it cut. But when I got there, the barbershop had been replaced by a hair salon.

Shinobu: Hi, I used to get my hair cut at the barbershop that was here.

Nicole: Yeah, they closed. We’ve been open for about a month. I can cut your hair.

Shinobu: Uh...I guess that’s okay.

Nicole: Why don’t you come over here and sit down. What do you have in mind?

Shinobu: Well, as you can see, my hair is pretty curly. When it’s long, it looks like an Afro. I want it to be a lot shorter, but I don’t want a buzz cut.

Nicole: Are you sure you want to cut it? If you keep it long, you could have great dreadlocks.

Shinobu: Uh, I’m not sure that that style would work for me.

Nicole: Okay, then. How about if I cut it short on the sides, leave the bangs medium length, and then keep the back long?

Shinobu: No, I don’t think that would work, either. I’d like it an inch off the collar in back, above the ears, no sideburns, with a part down the right side. I really just need a trim.

Nicole: Hmm…how about if I shave your head? You’d look great bald.

Shinobu: No! I definitely don’t want that. You know what, I just remembered that I’m supposed to be somewhere else right now.

Nicole: Oh, are you sure? I’m sure I know exactly what you want.

Shinobu: I’m sure you do, but I really have to go.

I left that hair salon as quickly as I could. Who knows what would have happened if I’d stayed there? She may have given me a Mohawk!

[End of story]

The script for our podcast today was written by Dr. Lucy Tse.

If you have a question or comment about our podcast, you can email us. Our email address is eslpod@eslpod.com.

From Los Angeles, California, I'm Jeff McQuillan. Thanks for listening. We'll see you next time on ESL Podcast.

English as a Second Language Podcast is written and produced by Dr. Lucy Tse, hosted by Dr. Jeff McQuillan. This podcast is copyright 2006.

Glossary
barbershop – a place where men get their hair cut

* I'm taking my brother to the barbershop tomorrow to get his hair cut before school starts on Monday.


hair salon – a place where men and women get their hair cut

* When I was little, I didn’t like going to the hair salon with my mother because it smelled of chemicals and hair spray.


curly – not straight; wavy; hair that curls

* He has curly hair and has to keep it short or it’ll look messy.


Afro – a thick hairstyle with very tight curls sticking out all around the head; bushy hairstyle with curly hair

* I’m tired of wearing my hair straight. I’m letting it grow out naturally into an Afro.


buzz cut – a haircut given with a razor or a machine normally used for men's shaving to leave the hair very, very short

* When my brother went into the military, they gave him a buzz cut.


dreadlocks – a hairstyle in which all the hair is braided into long, thin braids

* Dreadlocks take a long time to create, but don’t require a lot of care afterwards.


sides – the right and left sides of the head; the area around the ears

* Did you see the drummer for that band? He has blue hair in the middle and pink hair on the sides!


bangs – the part of the hair that covers part of one's forehead

* This kind of dog has long bangs that covers his eyes and makes it hard for him to see.


an inch off the collar – to cut hair so that it stops an inch above the shirt collar

* The school has a very strict dress code and requires that all male students cut their hair at least an inch off the collar.


above the ears – the area around the top of the ears

* Oh no! The barber cut the two sides above the ears to different lengths, and the left side definitely looks shorter than the right.

sideburns – strips of hair grown by men on each side of the face in front of the ears

* Long sideburns were a popular style back in the 70’s.


part – the line where the two sides of hair are separated on someone's head

* My cousin wears his part on the left to cover a scar on the right side of his forehead.


trim – cutting off a little hair

* I told the hair stylist that I wanted a trim, but he cut off three inches of my hair!


to shave – to use a razor or a men's shaving device to take off all the hair

* I'm afraid of shaving without an electric razor because I might cut myself.


bald – having no hair

* Benjamin likes being bald because he doesn't have to worry about drying his hair after he swims.


Mohawk – a hairstyle with most of the hair shaved, except for a line along the middle of the head

* When my brother walked in to the house with a Mohawk, my mother almost had a heart attack.

Comprehension Questions
1. What did Shinobu want to do to his hair?
a) He wanted to make his hair curly.
b) He wanted a trim.
c) He wanted to add sideburns.

2. Why did Shinobu leave the hair salon before getting his hair cut?
a) He had something else to do.
b) He wanted to find a barbershop.
c) He was worried the hair stylist would do strange things to his hair.

Answers at bottom.

What Else Does It Mean?
part

The word “part,” in this podcast, means the line where the two sides of hair are separated on someone's head: “My boyfriend parts his hair down the middle.” “Part” is also often used as a noun to describe a section of something larger: “I thought the kids would eat the entire cake but they only ate a small part to it.” If we make the word plural – “parts” – it can be used to mean the different sections of a car or a machine: “This car will never run if we can’t find the right parts for the engine.” Or, “Can you go to the store to see if you can find the right part to fix this refrigerator?” “Part” can also be used as a verb to mean to separate from someone: “In the movie, it was so sad when the young lovers had to part and leave each other forever.” Or, “The children cried when they had to part from their grandparents after a their summer visit.”

bangs

In this podcast, the word “bangs” means the part of the hair that covers part of the forehead: “Her bangs are so long that they cover her eyes.” The word “bang” can also be used to describe a loud sudden noise: “The gunshot next door sounded like a very loud bang.” Or, “He walked into the door carrying the new chair and let it fall to the ground with a bang.” “Bang” can also be an action. It can mean to hit something unexpectedly or hard: “I banged into the table, so now my knee hurts.” Or, “When no one answered the door, he banged on it angrily for a few minutes before walking away.”

Culture Note
The word “metrosexual” has been used a lot in the past ten years to describe men who spend a lot of time and money on the way they look and on their “lifestyle” or the way they live. Metrosexuals are usually men who live in “urban” areas or cities. When people hear this word, they usually think of men who pay as much attention to their appearance and the way they dress as many women do. In fact, metrosexuals use some of the same beauty services traditionally used by women.

Some metrosexual men are now going to “nail salons,” places that have beauty services for hands and feet. Men are now getting “manicures,” where their fingernails are cut, filed, and sometimes painted; and some may also get “pedicures,” where the same is done to their toenails. Men may also have their hands and feet treated to make them softer and smoother.

Men are also going to “spas,” or places that offer health and beauty treatments. At a spa, people can get “facials” or skin treatments for the face to make the skin look better. “Massages” at spas are very popular, where someone uses his or her hands to rub the muscles in your body to make you feel good. People who go to spas may also have “waxing” done, where hot wax is put on parts of the body to remove hair.

While nail salons and spas used to be places mainly for women, some men – metrosexual men – are using these services and it is now becoming more socially acceptable.

Comprehension Answers
1 - b

2 - c